What hell probably looks like! Southwest is mocked after giving ukuleles to flight passengers

The world’s first ukulele lesson at 30,000 feet took place last Friday on a Southwest Airlines flight from Long Beach to Honolulu.

Sadly, the class hasn’t been warmly received on social media, with one user even suggesting a war crimes trial would suit anyone willing to hand out free ukuleles to passengers.

The project was a collaboration between Southwest and instrument retailer Guitar Center. The organizers called it the “first flight ukulele lesson”. Passengers learned to play “Hello, Aloha”. How are you?’ in its entirety.

Flight time from Long Beach to Honolulu is five hours and 50 minutes. There are 175 passengers on board for the lesson.

The thought of being on the flight was enough to create a firestorm on Twitter. Tom Nichols of The Atlantic tweeted, “I’m a huge Southwest fan, but this could have made me murderous.”

Passengers received free ukuleles last Friday on a Southwest Airlines flight from Long Beach to Honolulu

This is one of many viral responses the promotion has received

This is one of many viral responses the promotion has received

In a press release, Southwest Airlines said it was pleased to join in the celebration of Hawaiian culture saying that it

In a press release, Southwest Airlines said it was pleased to join in the celebration of Hawaiian culture saying it “underscores our daily commitment to serving and celebrating the spirit of Aloha.”

User Omri Ceren tweeted: ‘That’s why The Hague exists’, a reference to the war crimes trials taking place in the Dutch city.

Someone else picked up on that theme, tweeting about the giveaway: “This is a violation of the Geneva Convention.”

Another person wrote: “What if you don’t want to hear a cacophony of ukuleles? What if you just wanted to sit quietly for the entire flight and watch TV or read, like a normal flight? »

The promotion apparently backfired with Southwest getting roasted on Twitter

The promotion apparently backfired with Southwest getting roasted on Twitter

A Twitter user says those behind the promotion deserve to be tried for war crimes

A Twitter user says those behind the promotion deserve to be tried for war crimes

The promotion led to one person suggesting an alternate mode of transportation

The promotion led to one person suggesting an alternate mode of transportation

Ukuleles donated by Southwest and Guitar Center are worth $60

Ukuleles donated by Southwest and Guitar Center are worth $60

There is an ongoing collaboration between Southwest and Guitar Center where music store customers can win a trip to Hawaii

There is an ongoing collaboration between Southwest and Guitar Center where music store customers can win a trip to Hawaii

Amtrak even had fun posting a photo of the Southwest passengers with the caption, “By the way, we have a quiet car.

While another said: “Trapped thousands of feet in the air with 180 people strumming ukuleles, they don’t know how to play sounds like the opposite of ‘fun’…”

A user named Howiszhu tweeted, “I’d be on the no-fly list if this happened to me.”

A passenger who was on board tweeted, “My flight was supposed to leave 20 minutes ago and a Southwest employee just pulled out a ukulele to entertain us.”

Some people took it more seriously, with one person tweeting: ‘You harassed a whole flight for a promotional partnership?!

They continued: “As someone with noise-related sensory processing issues, I would literally have been doubled up in my seat with my arms above my head, sobbing and having a panic attack. ”

Another wrote on Twitter: ‘I AM a music teacher and I would object. As much as I would personally love a free ukulele, I don’t think other people should be subjected to this against their will.

A passenger who was on board tweeted:

A passenger who was on board tweeted: ‘My flight was supposed to leave 20 minutes ago and a South West employee just pulled out a ukulele to entertain us’

The lesson took place after the drink service passed through the booth

The lesson took place after the drink service passed through the booth

The ukuleles that were given to passengers cost $60, according to the Guitar Center website

The ukuleles that were given to passengers cost $60, according to the Guitar Center website

Although the video shows that most passengers seem to enjoy the lessons, except for a few masked individuals who do not play small guitars.

Although the video shows that most passengers seem to enjoy the lessons, except for a few masked individuals who do not play small guitars.

At least one person didn’t think it was such a bad idea. User Joseph_Joe_M said, “I’ve never heard so much pleasureless moaning in my life.” It’s a great idea and if you can’t practice 20 minutes of ukulele without it threatening your peace of mind, maybe you should try swimming to Hawaii next time if you need that much of calm.

Southwest responded to the negative response by saying on Twitter, “Don’t worry y’all, everyone put their ukuleles away after 20 minutes because they had already mastered how to play.”

Although the video shows that most passengers seem to be enjoying the lessons, except for a few masked individuals who don’t play a small guitar.

The band’s teacher, Alexandra Windsor, who is the Educational Affairs Specialist for Guitar Center Lessons, told KTLA, “I have taught students through Guitar Center Lessons since 2014, but never on an airplane. It was inspiring to see how quickly passengers of all ages picked up the ukulele – many without musical training.

The lesson took place after the drink service had passed through the cabin.

The ukuleles that were given to passengers cost $60, according to the Guitar Center website. They also received a free case to keep their new gifts safe.

Windsor told KTLA, “The ukulele is the perfect instrument for beginners, and it shows how fun and easy learning something new can be.”

She was joined on the flight by two other Hawaiian teachers, Ryan Miyashiro and Ryan Imata.

In a press release, Southwest Airlines said it was pleased to join in the celebration of Hawaiian culture saying it “underscores our daily commitment to serving and celebrating the spirit of Aloha.”

Southwest posted a photo of the passengers on Twitter, adding, “By the time they got to Honolulu, they were pros.”

There is an ongoing collaboration between Southwest and Guitar Center where customers of the music store can win a trip to Hawaii. You can enter here. The deadline is September 30.

Portuguese immigrant Joao Fernandez brought the ukulele to Hawaii in the late 19th century. In his native country, the small guitar is known as the branguinha.

The instrument took off among the inhabitants of the island where it was renamed ukulele, which translates to “jumping chip”.

In 1961, the instrument was introduced to the world when Elvis Presley played it in the movie Blue Hawaii.

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