Musical instrument – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:21:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://swedishmusicshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Musical instrument – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ 32 32 Fingerpickin ‘good – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://swedishmusicshop.com/fingerpickin-good-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/fingerpickin-good-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Andy Atkinson / Mail Tribune Jim Schoenbachler, left, practices chords under Jeff Ebnother at Tom’s Guitars in downtown Medford. Tom’s Guitars instructor Jeff Ebnother says musical instruments can be an enjoyable pastime After teaching music locally for nearly 30 years, Jeff Ebnother knows that music can come across as “a foreign language” to many people […]]]>

Andy Atkinson / Mail Tribune Jim Schoenbachler, left, practices chords under Jeff Ebnother at Tom’s Guitars in downtown Medford.

Tom’s Guitars instructor Jeff Ebnother says musical instruments can be an enjoyable pastime

After teaching music locally for nearly 30 years, Jeff Ebnother knows that music can come across as “a foreign language” to many people who are learning an instrument for the first time.

And although studying music may be “slow” at first, he hopes his students can appreciate the value of learning a musical instrument.

“When you think of music, you can’t eat it, drink it, breathe it,” Ebnother said. “There is something about music that appeals to humans. It’s been like that since the dawn of time.

He teaches children and adults a range of instruments – electric guitar, bass, banjo and ukulele – at Tom’s Guitars, 1103 N. Riverside Ave., Medford.

Teaching her students in the local store is a full-time job, and Ebnother does it all from within the confines of her own space – with guitar scale posters and former Beatle John Lennon.

Outside of Tom’s, Ebnother oversees a studio in Ashland. Before that he was involved in one in Medford called Musichead.

For Ebnother, who studied music and geography at Southern Oregon University, teaching never got old. This is because it allows him to play and have positive interactions with people.

“Compared to other things, it’s about feeding people, helping people learn something new to them,” Ebnother said.

Where does the desire to play a musical instrument come from? Many of Ebnother’s students had a family member or friend who already knew this.

“Maybe their uncle was playing guitar and he would come over and play, and (they) would experience it and say, ‘Wow! It’s like magic. How do they do that with their fingers? ‘ ”Ebnother said.

Ebnother noted that even for music students who don’t perform live – like he did – doing it as a hobby requires dedication.

“Like a lot of things, you get out of it what you put in it,” he said. “If you stick with it (and) put in the time, the better you get, the more fun you have.” “

Ebnother recommends that students spend time alone with their instrument – rather than on the couch with a group of friends – to hone the craft.

“To become a good musician or even study music, it usually happens on your own; you need to have a calm workout time to do it without distraction to maintain your focus, ”Ebnother said.

When a musician approaches this musical perfection, “it is difficult to express in words” the feeling of accomplishment.

“You say to yourself, ‘Wow! I did it myself, ”Ebnother said. “I tell people that playing music is like cheap therapy – your problems aren’t going to go away, but they seem to be gone. “

If a player wants to venture out and play, even casually with others, the longtime music teacher recommends some dedication to the technical aspects of music, like learning to read it.

“It just helps their communication skills when working with other people who play music,” Ebnother said. “If somebody says, ‘hey, play a B flat chord’… everyone’s on the same page, they’re playing, they’re having fun. That’s why a very basic musicality, I think, is important.

Playing with a group can be a structured activity, much like music lessons. But when it comes to Ebnother, there is nothing wrong with “knotting” – a popular term for musical improvisation.

“You can start with structures like scales and arpeggios, but from there you have to put a little bit of yourself into it,” Ebnother said. “Noodle with those scales and arpeggios and come up with something that sounds good to your ear. I’m really big on it. You have to let go.

Above all, Ebnother tells his students, “You should always have fun playing music”.

Contact reporter Kevin Opsahl at 541-776-4476 or kopsahl@rosebudmedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @KevJourno.


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Donations of instruments arriving by truck for musicians in western Ky. https://swedishmusicshop.com/donations-of-instruments-arriving-by-truck-for-musicians-in-western-ky/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 22:52:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/donations-of-instruments-arriving-by-truck-for-musicians-in-western-ky/ RICHMOND, Ky. (WKYT) – Two weeks ago, we told you how Michael Johnathon, the founder of Woodsongs Old Time Radio Hour, is leading the effort to collect musical instruments and send them to the western region. of Kentucky to replace instruments that were destroyed or lost in tornadoes. Since the spread of our story, more […]]]>

RICHMOND, Ky. (WKYT) – Two weeks ago, we told you how Michael Johnathon, the founder of Woodsongs Old Time Radio Hour, is leading the effort to collect musical instruments and send them to the western region. of Kentucky to replace instruments that were destroyed or lost in tornadoes.

Since the spread of our story, more than a hundred instruments have been donated from all parts of the country. A woman even wanted to offer a piano of 800 pounds!

These musical instruments can be found in Richmond, in the basement of Currier’s Music World.

[Click here if you’d like to donate an instrument]

“I got checks and instruments from Indiana, Idaho, Washington state, Tennessee,” owner Cathy Currier said.

The instruments arrived by truck.

Michael Johnathon wants to replace instruments lost or destroyed by tornadoes and deliver those that are slightly used. It is his belief that music can heal.

Currier will tune and chain everything before heading west.

Currier knows that if you’ve lost everything, getting an instrument isn’t a top priority, but she thinks it’s a priority.

“These are not your basic needs, but they are there for your emotional needs,” said Currier.

Download the WKYT News app on ROKU, Apple TV and Amazon Fire.(WKYT)

Copyright 2021 WKYT. All rights reserved.


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Remo got his first musical instrument when he was four years old. As his memoir shows, he has never stopped since then https://swedishmusicshop.com/remo-got-his-first-musical-instrument-when-he-was-four-years-old-as-his-memoir-shows-he-has-never-stopped-since-then/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 03:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/remo-got-his-first-musical-instrument-when-he-was-four-years-old-as-his-memoir-shows-he-has-never-stopped-since-then/ My first musical instrument When I was about four years old, my father bought me a mouth organ. I guess it was the smallest, simplest musical instrument he could think of for a child. When he returned from la Fábrica (that’s what we called his cold drink factory) that evening, he couldn’t find me. Mom […]]]>

My first musical instrument

When I was about four years old, my father bought me a mouth organ. I guess it was the smallest, simplest musical instrument he could think of for a child. When he returned from la Fábrica (that’s what we called his cold drink factory) that evening, he couldn’t find me. Mom told her that I had been sitting under the bed and crying for half an hour, and she wasn’t quite sure why. He found me there with the mouth organ in my lap.

“What’s wrong, son?” ” He asked.

“I can’t play this song! I sobbed.

“Which?” he asked, surprised.

I played the introduction to The blue tango, hit the wrong fourth note again and sobbed louder in angry frustration.

Father understood immediately. His eyes shining with excitement, he told me to get dressed and get in the car. He led me to Pedro Fernandes, who owned the one and only music store that handled the whole Panjim musical and possibly all of North Goa, and requested a Hohner mouth organ. professional chromatic with a side button for sharps and flats. It came in a pretty box with a red velvet lining inside.

Back home, my dad explained how to hit the “hidden notes” by pressing the most important button, and I was delighted to finally be able to play the melody.

“What made you choose The blue tango as a first piece on the mouth organ? ” He asked.

I did not know. I just loved the melody. I still love him.

A few days after playing the mouth organ, I wanted to do something that I had seen doing at a party: play with one hand, while keeping the rhythm of a maraca de l ‘ other. The available maracas were too big and heavy for me. Father improvised and found me a small metal container; it was flat and circular, and he filled it halfway with green, smooth seeds. It made a great maraca sound, and I was in business.

I played for the mother and father, who had to sit in the living room; I drew back the curtains on the door and entered as if I were going up on a stage; Mother and father were made to clap, after which I would bow, sing and play. After Mother and Father clap again, I would make a final curtsey, pull the curtains aside and walk out of the room / off the stage.

I then performed and sang at every family reunion and birthday party when I was asked to perform, and always looked forward to being asked.

Music at home and in Goa

My father had purchased a German Nordmende radiogram from the one and only Panjim dealer called Senhor Mungró. A roentgenogram was a beautiful piece of highly polished teak or rosewood furniture in which several pieces of music reproduction equipment were housed, or almost hidden.

The one Father bought had a central valve radio, driven by a powerful, high-quality amplifier. Underneath was a stunning speaker set camouflaged behind a rich woven fabric set behind an intricate wooden grille.

There were also two speakers on its sides. At the top there were two horizontal doors that opened upwards: one to reveal a four-speed Dual record changer, on which you could stack up to twelve records of all sizes, and the second door revealed a tape recorder. with Telefunken coil. On the front, on the left and right sides of the cabinet, two beautiful rounded doors opened onto compartments with vertical slots where records were stored.

The roentgenogram began Father’s record collection. It was an eclectic mix of large brass bands, western classical symphonies, Brazilian baiãos, forró, bossa novas and sambas, solo singers and South American harmony groups such as Trio los Panchos and Trio los Paraguayos, popular Italian singers such as Renato Carosone and Caterina Valente, English and American singers whose names I don’t remember but whose songs I still hear in my head, a beautiful orchestral instrumental titled Anastasia which always made me feel sad, cheerful Portuguese folk songs, plaintive Portuguese fados of which Amália Rodrigues was the reigning queen of all time, and of course the rare and rare 78 rpm records which had then been composed of beautiful Goan Konkani mandos and popular songs.

Father loved Konkani’s songs, and I particularly remember one, Shivole, Sonar Khetti, Father’s favorite, because it was Siolim, his beloved village; I had to re-record my version in 2021, in tribute to Father and his composer, Cruz Noronha. After Goan’s mando and other folk songs, fado came second on his personal chart list.

On the first monsoon night of that year, there was a particularly spectacular thunderstorm of thunder and lightning. I was afraid. Father decided to teach me to appreciate the power of nature and not to be afraid of it. He turned off all the lights, put a classical symphony at a very high volume, and made me sit on his knees on the dark veranda.

We felt the powerful spray of rain on our faces; the whole black street was lit with brilliant silver lightning every few minutes, revealing familiar trees bent in half by the wind, the lightning punctuated with deep and loud rolls of thunder able to shake the house to its foundations; and providing a musical background to it all was Beethoven’s Fifth, since the electricity had not yet failed because of a fallen tree or branch. Father kept whispering softly and soothingly into my ear, trying to explain to a five year old the beauty and power of this scene.

Today I love to sit on my veranda on stormy monsoon nights, enjoy the surround sound of some of nature’s most vibrant energies, smell the wetland of Goa and sip a glass of something straight from my heart. from the soil of Goa. But that night, I burst into tears. Over Mother’s protests, Father abandoned his very specialized lesson in music and nature appreciation, took me inside and turned the music off. But the experience has stuck with me forever.


Every little party or gathering in Goa had music at the time. Not music played by a record player, but music played by the revelers themselves. Violins and mandolins would come out once the mood was right, the piano lid open, and people coughing and tuning their voices which, softened by a few choice golden lubricants, rose into a glorious song.

The instruments were exchanged hands, different people would sing “their” songs, and on the third, people would get up to dance. The music, singing, dancing and drinking continued until the buffet was declared open – which was invariably delayed as much as possible, lest the guests think the host was mean and stingy by putting on an end to the festivities.

And then everyone, now hungry but still unwilling to stop singing and dancing, walked to a popular marching tune, the couples arm in arm, into the dining room and around and around. the dining table, guitarists and violinists and mandolin players follow with their instruments. The pianist invariably remained to play alone in the hall.

Once the music was over and everyone gathered around the table, the most eloquent speaker in the assembly was asked to raise the much-needed twig or improvised toast. In my parents’ circle, this task usually fell to Senhor Vasco Alvares, the tall, stout, cheerful but irreverent man who was one of the pillars of Panjim society, and a good friend and party pal of Father.

His toasts were always a pleasure to listen to; they had just the right mix of pathos, emotion, family values ​​and, most importantly, naughty humor that got everyone from us kids (when we got it) to older grandparents, was present in uncontrollable bursts of laughter.

And then, before attacking the obligatory succulent piglet and turkey and king mackerel and lobsters and fried rice, Parabens a voçê Where Happy Birthday was sung in harmony by all, their enthusiasm heightened by their gratitude to the gracious host for this great feast, he in turn thanked the congregation for decades and even generations for their proven warmth, love and friendship.

After dinner was over, the feast invariably stopped, a custom that anyone except a Goan would consider rude; and everyone left shortly after, but not before a long farewell with lots of hugs and kisses on both cheeks. Pleasantly tired from the songs and dances, still humming a tune and feeling content with the large buffet, the families walked by moonlight and yellow lampposts to their cars and returned home where cool and comfortable beds provided them. were waiting.

Moonlight was a very important part of evenings and nights. Even in the cities where they existed, the street lamps were so faint that you could see and feel the full power of moonlight and starlight. Even more in the villages, where there was no electricity at all.

Music played a very important role in the daily life of people. You didn’t have to think of yourself as a musician or a singer to know how to play an instrument or sing a song – well, everyone knew how to do these things, it was as natural as speaking or writing. without seeing himself as a speaker or an author.

Once, at such a party at Tio Renato’s on the way to Altinho, my cousin Jorge, who was at least thirteen or fourteen at the time, got me drunk on champagne. I must have been six or seven. When he saw that I was starting to pass out, he panicked at the idea of ​​being discovered by his parents and mine. He sneaked me up the stairs to our car, which was parked on the main road with everyone else, made me sleep in the back seat and left me there to sleep.

Her “good deed of the day” was discovered a little later when Mom started looking for me. I think he got more headache from his dad’s slap the next morning than I did from my very first hangover – which, coming from the French champagne, probably shows that I started off well.

Extracted with permission from Remo: The Autobiography of Remo Fernandes, HarperCollins India.


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Georgia Music Store closes after 79 years in business https://swedishmusicshop.com/georgia-music-store-closes-after-79-years-in-business/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 11:41:42 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/georgia-music-store-closes-after-79-years-in-business/ Steve Shepherd assists a client on the last day of Chick Music on Wednesday December 15, 2021 in Athens, Georgia. Chick Music, a staple of the local music community, is closing due to the retirement of the Shepherd family after 79 years in business. (Kayla Renie / Athens Banner-Herald via AP) Kayla renie PA ATHENS, […]]]>

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Steve Shepherd assists a client on the last day of Chick Music on Wednesday December 15, 2021 in Athens, Georgia. Chick Music, a staple of the local music community, is closing due to the retirement of the Shepherd family after 79 years in business. (Kayla Renie / Athens Banner-Herald via AP)

PA

When Chick Music opened at 11 a.m. on December 15, customers were already waiting to take advantage of the reduced prices and strike up a friendly chat with employees.

If you missed the “Retirement Sale” signs in the window, it might have looked like a typical Athens holiday shopping afternoon.

It was the last day of activity for Chick Music, a family-owned musical instrument store that opened in 1942 in a store on College Avenue, where Lewis Chick tuned pianos in the basement. After joining the staff in 1947, Billy Shepherd and his wife, Anne, bought the business in 1963 and moved to 240 W. Clayton St. four years later.

As the second generation of Shepherds to lead Chick Music, Steve, Van and Christy have spent decades treating shop customers like family, and their retirement is hard earned and well deserved. On closing day, Steve was busy fixing a violin brought in for maintenance; Christy was on the register; and Van went back and forth between the sales area and the reception desk.

“This place is part of the musical history of Athens, but it was the people who came here who made it that way,” Van said. “We appreciate everyone who came today.”

One of the patrons who stopped by to pay tribute to Chick Music was Ken Richardson of Athens hip-hop legends Lo Down and Duddy, whose plaque on the Athens Music Walk of Fame is encrusted in the sidewalk just outside the outside the store. Richardson brought a pizza for the staff donated by Little Italy and shared stories of spending hours in the keyboard room in the early 1990s.

“It’s bittersweet for me to be here today,” said Richardson. “I learned to make beats on the Alesis SR16 drum machine they were selling here, and no one ever bothered me or asked me to leave. When I got my first tax return I went in and bought it.

Although the walls that were once lined with guitars and musical instruments were mostly bare, there were still plenty of accessories like drum heads, mic stands, and various cables for visitors to lean over. , as well as several sheet music books in the back room. .

Staff member Braxton Thompson, who has worked at Chick Music for more than a decade, said shepherds and their employees would likely share their tearful farewells when the store closes and they start moving shelves and counters. When asked what he was going to do next, Thompson said he plans to teach music and perform in concerts in the New Year.

In the family spirit that the shepherds learned from their mother and father, Van said that he, his brother and his sisters would not be fully out for a few weeks.

“Just knock on the window if you need something,” Van said.


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The violinist plans a concert on the theme of love for the city https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-violinist-plans-a-concert-on-the-theme-of-love-for-the-city/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 11:19:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-violinist-plans-a-concert-on-the-theme-of-love-for-the-city/ Violinist Huang Mengla will present a love-themed recital at the Shanghai Oriental Art Center in February. Originally from Shanghai, Huang is a graduate of the Shanghai Conservatory of Music and the Royal Academy of Music in London. In 2002, Huang gained international fame by winning the 49th Paganini International Violin Competition at the age of […]]]>

Violinist Huang Mengla will present a love-themed recital at the Shanghai Oriental Art Center in February.

Originally from Shanghai, Huang is a graduate of the Shanghai Conservatory of Music and the Royal Academy of Music in London. In 2002, Huang gained international fame by winning the 49th Paganini International Violin Competition at the age of 22.

He has performed with many world-class orchestras such as the Staatskapelle Dresden, the Wiener Symphoniker, the Czech Philharmonic, the Bamberger Symphoniker, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra and the NHK Symphony Orchestra.

In addition to a career as an international soloist, the 41-year-old teaches at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music and the Ishikawa Academy of Music in Japan.

Ti Gong

His recital on February 27 will consist of four parts – Joy of Love, Tenderness of Love, Farewell of Love and Rebirth of Love.

Joy of Love presents “March” by Prokofiev from the symphonic suite “The Love for Three Oranges”, as well as “Divertimento” by Stravinsky.

“Salut d’Amour” by Elgar and “Child’s Dream” by Ysaÿe will be performed in the second part.

The third part will begin with “Sorrow in Desert” by Tan Dun from “Hero Sonata”, which will be followed by “Liebeslied” by Kreisler and “Zigeunerweisen” by Sarasate.

Huang will then play the famous “The Butterfly Lovers” in Part 4 – The Rebirth of Love.

Pianist Huang Qiuning will join the show.

In a recent communication with local media, Huang presented his recital programs and shared his perspective on music education as a father.

Q: Did you choose the recital programs based on audience taste or your own preference?

A: These are more audience friendly programs compared to the sonatas I performed on this year’s tour. But I was not totally guided by the tastes of the public. Instead, I want to direct them, but also present them tracks that they want to hear from me.

I used to focus on how to make music melodic and melodious. Now I pay more attention to the structure and the intention of the composer. My feeling for music keeps changing, but what remains unchanged is my effort to present what I love to my audience.

Q: Are your students more drawn to pop music than serious classical music?

A: Of course they are, including my daughter. This is normal, because what makes pop songs popular is their pleasant melody and tempo, which are friendly to most listeners.

But classical music requires that a listener take an active approach. Resonance only occurs when a listener has accumulated adequate life experience.

Q: So how do you teach classical music and cultivate an aesthetic sense for young people?

A: In my opinion, having children practice a musical instrument or listen to classical music is rudimentary education to give them another hobby or life choice.

When they reach a certain age, they will feel grateful for the musical education they received at a young age. The aesthetic sense is cultivated in a subliminal way. Time will prove it.

Q: You have a 10 year old daughter who also practices the violin. What do you think is most crucial for a music learner, talent or hard work?

A: I have never seen a good musician who only depended on talent or hard work. Talent is the flame and hard work is firewood. Firewood needs flame to start, and flame needs firewood to grow.

In this modern age, children are easily distracted by new entertainment choices. Maintaining concentration is the biggest challenge for music learners today.

Q: Have you ever considered becoming a conductor or composer?

A: I can compose, but my composition will not be of much value. So why should I do it? I respect my job, which is simple: perform well and teach well.


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Autistic cellist finds his goal, voice to music https://swedishmusicshop.com/autistic-cellist-finds-his-goal-voice-to-music/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 13:14:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/autistic-cellist-finds-his-goal-voice-to-music/ LOS ANGELES – For Adam Mandela Walden, the cello is not just an instrument. This is how he interacts with the world. Adam was almost a year old when his mother, Roseanne Walden, says he stopped talking and making eye contact. He’s been diagnosed with moderate / severe autism and hasn’t spoken for years, but […]]]>

LOS ANGELES – For Adam Mandela Walden, the cello is not just an instrument. This is how he interacts with the world.

Adam was almost a year old when his mother, Roseanne Walden, says he stopped talking and making eye contact. He’s been diagnosed with moderate / severe autism and hasn’t spoken for years, but Roseanne says he’s found a way to function that makes him happy.

“It’s absolutely music,” she said.

As a young child, Roseanne got Adam involved in Special Olympics. Someone there recommended that she try playing the violin, and she says it was going well with one exception.

After Adam finished a song, she said “he would take a victory lap around the house”.

A cello, she thought, might keep him more grounded. So when he was about 5 or 6, she bought him one.

“And that was it. He was in love, “she recalls.” It literally became her voice. “

Adam is no stranger to the spotlight. British neuroscientist Oliver Sachs diagnosed him with Scientist Syndrome. He has been featured in two HBO documentaries on autism and has performed with the Los Angeles Youth Orchestra, touring California with Gustavo Dudamel.

Adam played the cello for federal judges when his mother successfully fought to get him into a magnetic school. Once there, Roseanne continued to fight, this time to get him into the school orchestra. She is still moved when she remembers this first performance.

“We worked so hard to make it fit in,” she said, barely fighting back tears. “He was the only special kid in his class and his classmates were so proud of him. “

She continued to defend her place in the music world, living with Adam in Boston while he attended Berklee College of Music.

“That’s what he’s supposed to do,” she said of her son. “It’s his way of being part of society.”

Getting Adam seen and heard is Roseanne’s life mission, and appearing on stage as part of the LA County Holiday celebration is certainly one way to introduce him to another large audience. The 62nd annual event is a celebration of the diversity of the Angelenos, featuring artists from all walks of life, neighborhoods, cultures and abilities.

Roseanne says their family went to the show every year when Adam was a child.

“We always said to her, ‘you know, Adam, if you practice, maybe one year you can be on the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Stage’,” she recalls.

This will be Adam’s first year there, accompanied by classical pianist Jordan Daniels as he performs two classical pieces. Adam knows the music by heart, but he keeps practicing, to make sure he’s ready.

“I can’t wait to perform on stage at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in downtown LA,” he said.

Adam is also working on an original composition that includes excerpts from a book written by a 13-year-old autistic boy called “The Reason I Jump”. He recites the text playing original pieces inspired by it.

“But what we really want,” he read between rhythmic notes, “is to be able to look to a better future.”

This is also what his mother wants. Roseanne is very worried about Adam’s future after his departure and hopes to create a place for him, a musical group home especially for people with autism.

“We have to find their place in society for what they can do and what they can contribute,” she explained.

They have strengths and talents and a lot to teach us, she says. We just have to learn to listen.

Due to concerns about COVID-19, the LA County holiday celebration will not be played live in front of an audience. Instead, it will be streaming and televised on Christmas Eve and over Christmas.


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The music of Chaozhou inherited by the younger generation https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-music-of-chaozhou-inherited-by-the-younger-generation/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:31:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-music-of-chaozhou-inherited-by-the-younger-generation/ Musician Chen Junhui plays Chaozhou music with Guzheng, a traditional Chinese musical instrument, in Chaozhou, south China’s Guangdong Province on December 14, 2021. Chaozhou music refers to all types of folk music popular in Chaoshan region, eastern Guangdong province, southern China. . With a history stretching back over 1,000 years, traditional instruments such as suona, […]]]>

Musician Chen Junhui plays Chaozhou music with Guzheng, a traditional Chinese musical instrument, in Chaozhou, south China’s Guangdong Province on December 14, 2021. Chaozhou music refers to all types of folk music popular in Chaoshan region, eastern Guangdong province, southern China. . With a history stretching back over 1,000 years, traditional instruments such as suona, yehu, erxian (two-string violins), gongs and drums are commonly used in performances. (Xinhua)


Musician Ding Zengqin (1st R), 74, teaches young people how to play Chaozhou music in Shantou, south China's Guangdong Province, December 15, 2021. Chaozhou music refers to everyone types of folk music popular in Chaoshan region, eastern province of Guangdong.  in southern China.  With a history stretching back over 1,000 years, traditional instruments such as suona, yehu, erxian (two-string violins), gongs and drums are commonly used in performances. (Xinhua)

Musician Ding Zengqin (1st R), 74, teaches young people how to play Chaozhou music in Shantou, south China’s Guangdong Province, December 15, 2021. Chaozhou music refers to everyone types of folk music popular in Chaoshan region, eastern province of Guangdong. in southern China. With a history stretching back over 1,000 years, traditional instruments such as suona, yehu, erxian (two-string violins), gongs and drums are commonly used in performances. (Xinhua)

Musician Chen Junhui plays Chaozhou music with Guzheng, a traditional Chinese musical instrument in Chaozhou, southern China's Guangdong Province on December 14, 2021. Chaozhou music refers to all types performing folk music in the Chaoshan region, eastern Guangdong province, southern China.  With a history stretching back over 1,000 years, traditional instruments such as suona, yehu, erxian (two-string violins), gongs and drums are commonly used in performances. (Xinhua)

Musician Chen Junhui plays Chaozhou music with Guzheng, a traditional Chinese musical instrument in Chaozhou, southern China’s Guangdong Province on December 14, 2021. Chaozhou music refers to all types performing folk music in the Chaoshan region, eastern Guangdong province, southern China. With a history stretching back over 1,000 years, traditional instruments such as suona, yehu, erxian (two-string violins), gongs and drums are commonly used in performances. (Xinhua)

Performers perform a traditional Chaozhou drum piece in Chaozhou, southern China's Guangdong Province, December 14, 2021. Chaozhou music refers to all types of folk music popular in the Chaoshan region, in the eastern province of Guangdong, in southern China.  With a history stretching back over 1,000 years, traditional instruments such as suona, yehu, erxian (two-string violins), gongs and drums are commonly used in performances. (Xinhua)

Performers perform a traditional Chaozhou drum piece in Chaozhou, southern China’s Guangdong Province, December 14, 2021. Chaozhou music refers to all types of folk music popular in the Chaoshan region, in the eastern province of Guangdong, in southern China. With a history stretching back over 1,000 years, traditional instruments such as suona, yehu, erxian (two-string violins), gongs and drums are commonly used in performances. (Xinhua)


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The best local bands or musicians in Kamloops, according to your vote https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-best-local-bands-or-musicians-in-kamloops-according-to-your-vote/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 22:19:02 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-best-local-bands-or-musicians-in-kamloops-according-to-your-vote/ Holidays are synonymous with happiness and conviviality, and nothing unites people and sets the mood more than music. Whatever the genre, music is a universal language that dates back over 45,000 years! Kamloops’ music scene may not be that far back, but it has huge and very talented established and emerging names. We are not […]]]>

Holidays are synonymous with happiness and conviviality, and nothing unites people and sets the mood more than music.

Whatever the genre, music is a universal language that dates back over 45,000 years!

Kamloops’ music scene may not be that far back, but it has huge and very talented established and emerging names.

We are not the type to break traditions prior to the Paleolithic Age, so we name the best local bands or musicians in Kamloops as voted by you and presented by Valley First, a division of First West Credit Union.

Bronze – Jeremy Kneeshaw

Jeremy Kneeshaw is a funky and versatile songwriter and performer straight out of Kamloops.

Musical focus: Jazz / Funk / Fusion

Difficult to corner Jeremy Kneeshaw since he does a little bit of absolutely everything.

Is it a solo or a group? It is a solo act as well as part of a duet and a trio.

What instrument does he play? Let’s start with guitar, piano, drums, bass, mandolin, banjo, flute, accordion and more, of course.

One thing we’re sure of is that, with or without a band, Jeremy Kneeshaw puts on a very energetic, fun, and emotional show that won’t disappoint.

For bringing a new sound to Kamloops, and all his own, Jeremy Kneeshaw is this year’s bronze winner for Best Local Band or Musician in Kamloops, by your vote.

Discover his new album on Spotify, iTunes or Google Play and follow it on Facebook.

Silver – Dave Coalmine Band

Dave Coalmine is also a lot, but he’s definitely a rock star at heart.

<who> Photo credit: Dave Coalmine </who>“class =” img-responsive “src =” https://www.kamloopsbcnow.com/files/files/images/Screen%20Shot%202021-12-17%20at%201_55_08%20PM.png “/></p>
<h4>Musical focus: Rock / Pop / Folk / Dance</h4>
<p>Dave Coalmine has a number of musical projects, ranging from acoustic solo to wild karaoke.  The one that puts it in the spotlight today is the Dave Coalmine Band.</p>
<p>The Dave Coalmine Band is a group of 5 musicians focused on variety.  This means that you are constantly switching to the catchy dance music and hits of the last five decades or so. </p>
<p>Between originals and covers of various genres, the one thing that stays constant throughout a Dave Coalmine Band show is the full dance floor. </p>
<p>Dave Coalmine Band’s harmonious blend of piano, bass, drums and electric and acoustic guitar will rock any pub, club, festival or wedding.  by you.</p>
<p>Check out the Dave Coalmine Band channel on YouTube and Soundcloud, and follow them on Facebook.</p>
<h2>Gold – Madison Olds</h2>
<p>Madison Olds may be a Kamloops resident, but her music has spread far beyond Kamloops and British Columbia!</p>
<blockquote class=

Musical focus: Pop

Madison has been at the top of the charts since 2019, but has been making music for much longer.

The release of Madison’s debut album immediately opened doors for her to open stages for Willie Nelson and Kacey Musgraves. Her hit, “Thank You,” placed her in the CBC Searchlight Top 10 in 2019, as well as on Canada’s Hot AC Radio charts and as far as Singapore’s Music Matters showcase.

The 2021 release of her EP, “Drowning in My Thoughts,” launched Madison internationally, garnering her 1.7 million streams. Hits like “Best Part of Me” have reached the Top 30 on several Billboard and Media charts, including No. 22 on Billboard’s Emerging Canadian Artist Chart.

Madison has since won Bell Media’s “Future Star” program, but we think she’s already a star!

Discover Madison’s music directly on her site, Spotify, YouTube and Soundcloud, and join her TikTok initiatives by attracting support and awareness for stem cell research and garnering her millions of likes!



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Re-mapping the local musical ecosystem – Tone Madison https://swedishmusicshop.com/re-mapping-the-local-musical-ecosystem-tone-madison/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 06:01:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/re-mapping-the-local-musical-ecosystem-tone-madison/ Madison Concert Halls began the process of gradual reopening this year, with varying degrees of precautions and enforcement put in place. But even the most concentrated efforts cannot eliminate all risks – we still see reports of local emissions linked to positive COVID-19 tests – and local music as a whole has felt alienated from […]]]>

Madison Concert Halls began the process of gradual reopening this year, with varying degrees of precautions and enforcement put in place. But even the most concentrated efforts cannot eliminate all risks – we still see reports of local emissions linked to positive COVID-19 tests – and local music as a whole has felt alienated from its live moorings. in 2021, just like she did in 2020. As someone who has found a purpose in attending and playing shows, it is quite clear to me that the cumulative effect of the pandemic still weighs heavily. on our music community. Now was the time to offer a reflection on Madison’s musical changes in 2021.

With uncertainty dominating over organizational ends, it’s no surprise that more and more musicians are turning to self-liberation. Everyone is hit hard, so even bands that have the option to release through a label, as was the case with the recent one. at home with… And Dirtnap Records — there are built-in timelines when it comes to making a recording public. Tighter funding for theaters, labels and creative teams is not a new phenomenon, but over the past two years extreme financial strains have become the norm. And it has become much more restrictive. Artists like Proud Parents have taken on this challenge by leaning more into a DIY approach out of necessity and zeal for the music itself.

Predictably enough, a number of artists from the DIY punk scene have gone through the current adjustment period well. Graham Hunt, Cal Lamore and Tyler Fassnacht of Proud Parents have all had their names attached to an impressive number of local releases in 2021, positioning themselves firmly at the center of Madison’s indie-punk community. These changes have not only been isolated in one genre, as a number of Madison’s jazz, metal, and experimental artists have reached state and country borders more frequently for collaborators; the growing emphasis on virtual partnerships has given many more leeway for creative digital exploration.

Within these virtual partnerships lies the foundation of a framework that offers enticing possibilities to both musicians and listeners. By taking the distant road, there is a small but important chance that we may see, collectively, a lesser emphasis on access; the kind of geographic privilege that previously elevated acts in major media markets like LA and NYC wouldn’t carry as much weight. [Editor’s note: as someone who has lived in both Brooklyn and Madison, I’ve experienced the differences firsthand and they’re notable.] While it was inevitable that musicians in larger markets would still have a geographic advantage (access to a multitude of publicists, high traffic publications, increased networking, high visibility venues, etc.), the rules of the game could begin to be gradually balanced. Listeners, in turn, might also see more opportunities for exposure to artists that they would otherwise have a minimal chance of meeting through the collaboration. Strengthening the symbiotic and community traits inherent in music in general opens an important door to the expansion of diversity at the micro and macro levels.

On the issue of diversity, the 2021 Economic Impact Report on Equity in Madison’s Music Community showed more than ever that Madison has an extremely disheartening problem. Our article, “Music in Madison Can Pay, If You’re White and Not a Musician,” which summarized the findings of this report, perfectly summed up one of the most striking factors in this problem in the title. While Madison’s institutions and systems masquerade as progressives while fiercely struggling against progressive practices – or actively pushing them back through hyper-corporate fetishism – are nothing new, they still pose a surprising threat to the achievement of true equity. Funding opportunities in Madison, and in particular Madison’s music, always greatly favor nationally backed mega-entities over local and independent perspectives.

We’ve had almost two years to think about how to provide more support to smaller names and we’re still pretty much where we were at the start of 2020, except now independent operations are under pressure. even greater financial. Whether we like to admit it or not, our local music ecosystem still faces the looming possibility of disturbing results. We should all be thankful that Madison’s musicians seem determined to keep the city’s spark of independent musical creativity alive. If the larger systems around them aren’t there to nurture that spark in a flame, 2021 has amply proven that there are still people – and places, if they survive – who will and will do so. responsible, even in the face of great personal cost. Our greatest hopes have never rested on national recognition but on local achievements. In 2021, the musicians of Madison reminded us of what this achievement can look and sound like.

This year has proven to be critical for Madison’s music, not only because of the accomplishments or stark callbacks of work yet to be done, but because of the collective knowledge gleaned across that spectrum. We have come to a precipice and if we are to move forward instead of idling we need to invest more in local music. A week of intensive Tone Madison a blanket honoring and reflecting on its merits won’t do much to address the underlying structural issues, but we hope it helps. The enormous, intrinsic and intangible value of our local music community deserves all the support it can get.


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Cal Poly’s annual Bach Week will take place in person January 18-22 • Atascadero News https://swedishmusicshop.com/cal-polys-annual-bach-week-will-take-place-in-person-january-18-22-atascadero-news/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 22:56:38 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/cal-polys-annual-bach-week-will-take-place-in-person-january-18-22-atascadero-news/ Bach Week offers a range of events, including an organ concert coupled with an Akademie lecture SAN LUIS OBISPO – The Cal Poly Music Department will present its annual Bach Week in person Tuesday through Saturday, January 18-22, with presentations and performances on campus and at the First Presbyterian Church in San Luis Obispo. Bach […]]]>

Bach Week offers a range of events, including an organ concert coupled with an Akademie lecture

SAN LUIS OBISPO – The Cal Poly Music Department will present its annual Bach Week in person Tuesday through Saturday, January 18-22, with presentations and performances on campus and at the First Presbyterian Church in San Luis Obispo.

Bach Week offers a range of events, including an organ concert coupled with an Akademie lecture, a chamber concert with guest vocal and instrumental artists playing on period instruments, two master classes and a final concert of vocal and instrumental works with a pre-conference concert.

The first events will take place on campus:

Go through this together, Atascadero

– On January 18, there will be an Akademie conference and organ showcase in the Miossi Hall of the Performing Arts Center (# 6). At 6 p.m., co-director David Arrival will present a lecture entitled “Bach and the Organ”. During his lifetime, JS Bach was known less as a composer than for his knowledge and ability to improvise on the pipe organ. The lecture will explore Bach’s multifaceted relationship with this instrument, with musical examples performed by academic organist Paul Woodring. At 7:30 p.m., Woodring will present a concert of organ music by Bach on the Forbes Pipe Organ.

– At 11:10 a.m. on January 20, in room 218 of the Davidson Music Center (No.45), guest artist Leif Woodward, cello, will lead Cal Poly students in the instrumental repertoire of the Baroque era and give a style insight and nuance to give a historically informed performance. At 12:10 p.m., he will train students to play effectively in continuo.

– At 3:10 p.m. on January 20, in Room 218 of the Davidson Music Center (# 45), guest artists Kerry Ginger and John Buffett will lead several Cal Poly singing students into the Baroque era repertoire.

The final events will take place at the First Presbyterian Church of San Luis Obispo:

– At 7:30 pm on January 21, a concert entitled “A Musical Portrait of a Venetian Courtesan” will be presented as a musical tour of Renaissance Venice. The courtesan occupied a unique social position, as she was able to circumvent many of the patriarchal restrictions placed on women who make music. This concert will explore this world, from the interpretation of “high-art” madrigals by Barbara Strozzi and the maestri of San Marco Willeart and Rore, to “debauchery” carnival chants in dialetto. The concert will be performed by the world-class Tesserae Baroque period instrument ensemble. Works for solo voice and small instrument ensemble featuring guest artist Rebecca Myers, soprano, will complete the program.

– The final Bach Week concert will take place on January 22 with a pre-concert lecture. At 6 p.m., co-director Scott Glysson will present a lecture on the history of the musical settings of Psalm 130 and the context of JS Bach’s Cantata, “Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu dir” and “Delalande” by Michel Richard Delalande Deepis. The concert “From the depths” begins at 7:30 p.m. der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu dir ”, BWV 131. About 20 years earlier, the French composer Delalande had written his powerful“ De profundis ”on the same text, but in a different language. Both works will be performed, as will a suite of French music, conducted by the musicians of Tesserae Baroque, will conclude the program. Members of the Cal Poly Chamber Choir, Symphony and faculty join guest artists for a side-by-side performance of these works.

Tickets for the conference and concert on January 18 are $ 10; tickets for the January 21 concert are $ 20 for the public and $ 10 for students; and tickets for the Jan. 22 conference and concert are $ 20 for the public and $ 10 for students. There are reduced prices if tickets are purchased for the concerts on January 21 and 22: $ 30 public, $ 15 students. Admission is free for Davidson Music Center events, although parking is required. For more information on visitor parking on campus, visit the Cal Poly Transportation and Parking Services website.

The events are sponsored by the Cal Poly College of Liberal Arts, the Music Department, the Teaching Activities Program, and the Tevis Fund for Visiting Artists. Further support is provided by the Handler and Steiner Family Fund.

For more information, visit the Bach Week website or call the Music Department at 805-756-2406.


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