Musical instrument – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 19:53:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://swedishmusicshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Musical instrument – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ 32 32 The Vineyard Gazette – Martha’s Vineyard News https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 18:32:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ Refreshing breezes continue as temperatures remain in the 70s. A few more beach days to come. The remnants of Hurricane Larry created huge waves at Squibnocket Beach last Friday, with surfers of all ages enjoying. Parking was at a premium. The Town of Aquinnah will enforce parking regulations at the Philbin Beach parking lot until […]]]>

Refreshing breezes continue as temperatures remain in the 70s. A few more beach days to come.

The remnants of Hurricane Larry created huge waves at Squibnocket Beach last Friday, with surfers of all ages enjoying. Parking was at a premium.

The Town of Aquinnah will enforce parking regulations at the Philbin Beach parking lot until September 30, as well as parking regulations in all resident permit parking areas in the city until further notice.

Across the line at Chilmark, Lucy Vincent Beach opened to the public on September 16, according to the City of Chilmark website.

At the Aquinnah Public Library, Little Bird Music will be held on the bridge on Thursdays for the next three weeks. Please bring a blanket to sit on and a musical instrument.

The Library Book Club will meet on September 23 at 3 p.m. to discuss American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins. The group will meet on the bridge.

Also on September 23, Merissa Nathan Gerson, author of Forget Prayers, Bring Cake, will explore the themes of grief and community in a meeting on Zoom at 5 p.m.

The Outermost Inn will remain open until the end of September, except Monday evenings. Please call (508) 645-3511 to reserve.

The Menemsha Bike Ferry will continue to operate until September from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends.

Stephanie Hughes returned home to Nyack, NY after spending a week with daughter Gabriella Camilleri and husband Steve Hutchinson. Stephanie spoke at the Aquinnah Public Library on the topic of Shakespeare and the Vineyard. She is very happy to announce that her book will be published soon.

Isabelle Lumb left for Chicago on Thursday, after spending a year and a half with her mother Jessie Shafer and working remotely from home.

Zachary Macey, son of Jon and Amy, left for his first year at Proctor Academy, where he is a member of the lacrosse team. Zach spent the summer working at Cliffhangers.

Jessica Shafer is delighted to receive her new boat soon. His previous boat was unfortunately damaged during its transport to the vineyard.

Happy 22nd birthday to James and Nancy Benoit on September 18th.

Happy 17th birthday to Jason Baird and Jessie Little Doe on September 18th.

Happy 6th birthday to Taylor and Sarah Ives on September 19th.

Happy 15th birthday to Ken Wentworth and Liz Witham on September 23.

Happy 43rd birthday to David and Diane Jensen on September 23.

Happy 60th birthday to Ted and Judy Mayhew on September 23.

Happy birthday to Shirley Howell, who celebrated on the 13th.

Lenny Clarke will be celebrating on September 16. Jason Baird will be partying on the 17th.

Diana Lees, Nicole Ferguson and Nadia Aiguier will celebrate on the 18th and Keith Devine on the 19th. Amos Sauer will be 13 on the 20th. Janay Dlabj and Stanley McMullen also celebrate on the 20th.

Bill Murray and Trip Barnes will celebrate on September 21. Janet Foley celebrates her special day on September 22, sharing the day with William Haoa Vanderhoop, who turns 10. USCG CS1 Alex Smith will be partying on the 22nd. Leslie Clapp is partying on the 23rd, as will Ariel White. Jamie Thigpen and Jeffrey Madison will celebrate on the 24th.


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SYNTH GEMS 1: A coffee table book that showcases vintage synthesizers https://swedishmusicshop.com/synth-gems-1-a-coffee-table-book-that-showcases-vintage-synthesizers/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/synth-gems-1-a-coffee-table-book-that-showcases-vintage-synthesizers/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 02:53:58 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/synth-gems-1-a-coffee-table-book-that-showcases-vintage-synthesizers/ By Sam McNiece From the Minimoog to the Oberheim Matrix-12. Bjooks, publisher of titles for musical instrument books including Push Turn Move, Patch & Tweak and Pedal Crush, is back with a new hardcover book exploring vintage synths in detail. Synth Gems 1 is a 320-page large book with color photographs and in-depth analysis of […]]]>

By Sam McNiece

From the Minimoog to the Oberheim Matrix-12.

Bjooks, publisher of titles for musical instrument books including Push Turn Move, Patch & Tweak and Pedal Crush, is back with a new hardcover book exploring vintage synths in detail. Synth Gems 1 is a 320-page large book with color photographs and in-depth analysis of over 60 vintage synthesizers.

What would you like to know:

  • Bjooks released the 320-page hardcover book SYNTH GEMS 1.
  • The book examines vintage, weird and rare synths in detail with color photographs and a breakdown of historical context and sound design.
  • Over 60 synths are covered in the book with a preface by Vince Clark of renowned Depeche Mode and Erasure.

Read all the latest product news here.

Written by “Dr. Mike” Metlay, who spent over 23 years writing for US pro-audio mag RECORD alongside music engineering and production, this book puts synthesizers at the forefront, with beautiful photographs of Peter M. Mahr who had to go to various museums to find and photograph the synths in question.

“SYNTH GEMS is truly an ode to the synthesizer in all its forms,” says Kim Bjørn, CEO and Founder of Bjooks. “As you browse through the book, readers will discover popular favorites like the Sequential Circuits Prophet-5, as well as rare instruments like the Lord Synthesisers Skywave. SYNTH GEMS is a must-have for any fan of electronic music, whether a longtime musician or a beginner.

Released at the same time as the SUPERBOOTH show taking place in Berlin, the book covers well-known synths from the Minimoog (see above) to wacky synths you’ve probably never heard of. The book begins with this synth in 1970, moving through time until reaching the year 2000, the last synth mentioned being the Alesis Andromeda.

“Over the past few years there has been a massive increase in interest in these beautiful vintage instruments,” says Bjørn. “As a result, we wanted the SYNTH GEMS series to provide beginners with a solid foundation and unique insight into the history of synthesizers. We hope that some of these pages may inspire creative musical journeys among our readers. “

Along with the impact synthesizers have had on today’s musical landscape, this book traces their influence and the inner workings of some game-changing beasts of electronic music.

Check out Bjooks for more information on this book.


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Bruce Springsteen delivers moving performance at 9/11 Memorial https://swedishmusicshop.com/bruce-springsteen-delivers-moving-performance-at-9-11-memorial/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/bruce-springsteen-delivers-moving-performance-at-9-11-memorial/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 15:58:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/bruce-springsteen-delivers-moving-performance-at-9-11-memorial/ Bruce Springsteen performed in World Trade Center plaza on Saturday at a memorial to mark the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Springsteen chose to play “I’ll See You in My Dreams,” a song from his latest album, Letter to you. Springsteen accompanied himself by guitar and harmonica. After he performed the […]]]>

Bruce Springsteen performed in World Trade Center plaza on Saturday at a memorial to mark the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Springsteen chose to play “I’ll See You in My Dreams,” a song from his latest album, Letter to you. Springsteen accompanied himself by guitar and harmonica. After he performed the song, the families of the victims continued to read the names of the deceased, a tradition that began on the first anniversary of September 11.

President Joe Biden and former Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama also attended the ceremony. Biden, who will also be visiting the other sites of the attacks in Pennsylvania and the Pentagon, did not speak. Instead, the White House released a video Friday, in which Biden paid tribute to the victims and their families. “It doesn’t matter how much time has passed, and these commemorations bring everything back painfully, like you just heard the news a few seconds ago,” Biden said in the clip. “And so on this day, Jill and I hold you close to our hearts and send you our love.”

After the September 11 terrorist attacks, Springsteen responded to the grief felt by the country with his acclaimed 2002 album The climb. The album features the title track, “Mary’s Place”, “Lonesome Day”, “Countin ‘on a Miracle”, “My City of Ruins” and “Waitin’ on a Sunny Day”. “The Rising” was included in Springsteen’s one-man show on Broadway.

A performance of “My City of Ruins” was included on the September 21, 2001 show America: A Tribute to Heroes, with members of the E Street Band. “The air was very charged,” said Layonne Holmes, who performed with Springsteen, recently at the Asbury Park Press. “People were aware of the gravity of the whole situation and for us in particular because we were the first to play. I remember the set was dark and there were all these candles and the cameras and then we were on. “

“The Rising” is the story of firefighters who climbed the stars of the Twin Towers to save all they could, but the lyrics also reflect their ascension to heaven. “One of the most powerful images of the 11 I had read in the newspaper, some of the people going down were talking about the rescuers going up,” Springsteen said on Night line after The climb has been freed. “The idea of ​​these guys going up the stairs, up the stairs, up, up. I mean you could go up a smoky staircase; you could be in the afterlife, move on.”

Springsteen’s performance on Saturday received positive reviews on Twitter. “That sad sound of a lonely musical instrument playing while names read in New York # 911Anniversary is absolutely haunting. Thank you, Bruce Springsteen,” a fan wrote. “I cried at that time,” another wrote.



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Virtual exhibition brings Lesotho musical tradition and clay art to life https://swedishmusicshop.com/virtual-exhibition-brings-lesotho-musical-tradition-and-clay-art-to-life/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/virtual-exhibition-brings-lesotho-musical-tradition-and-clay-art-to-life/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 14:37:51 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/virtual-exhibition-brings-lesotho-musical-tradition-and-clay-art-to-life/ The beginning of the news broadcast on Radio Lesotho is signaled by an unforgettable, rather harsh vibrating noise, as if it were produced by a large bird. It is the lesiba, a musical arc. Lesiba was played by boys and men who looked after the cattle, before radios and cell phones began to replace the […]]]>

The beginning of the news broadcast on Radio Lesotho is signaled by an unforgettable, rather harsh vibrating noise, as if it were produced by a large bird. It is the lesiba, a musical arc. Lesiba was played by boys and men who looked after the cattle, before radios and cell phones began to replace the national musical instrument.

Nowadays, there is little apparent concern with maintaining interest in lesiba at school or at any other national level in Lesotho. The instrument’s unique sound – once reminiscent of a rural way of life – seems to exist in a disconnected and disembodied way on the radio.

And the people who still play traditional Lesotho instruments – musicians, instrument makers and innovators in their art – are rarely recognized or rewarded for their expertise.

But a collaboration led by the South African College of Music at the University of Cape Town aims to draw attention to Lesotho’s musical tradition. The collaboration involves filming musicians and exhibiting related works of art. We have recorded musicians playing four instruments which are also depicted in clay figurines made by the late Lesotho artist Samuele Makoanyane (1909-1944).

Iziko South African Museum, in collaboration with Dijondesign (heritage consultants for Lesotho National Museum and Art Gallery), created a virtual exhibition of the delicate figurines.

They used photogrammetry – recording, measuring and mapping – to create 3D digital models of the sculptures. These digital models measure between 8cm and 18cm in height. They allow detailed and interactive exploration. The figurines are on display through the South African Iziko Museum. Lesotho’s new National Museum and Art Gallery will also feature them when it officially opens in 2022.

We also worked with the Morija Museum and Archive, the Morija Art Center and the Lesotho National Museum and Art Gallery to create a film. Called Music in the mountain kingdom, it documents the musical culture of Lesotho and accompanies the exhibition of figurines. Prior to the pandemic containment, we also planned to include live performances by musicians in the exhibits.

Makoanyane figurines

The seven exquisite and little-known clay figurines in the exhibition were made by Makoanyane in the 1930s. They were commissioned by musicologist Professor Percival Kirby of the University of the Witwatersrand, in order to document the musicians of Lesotho and their instruments . Manufactured in the centuries-old tradition of low-temperature pit cooking, they are extremely fragile. They are supported in the Kirby Collection of Musical Instruments at the South African College of Music.

Makoanyane lived mainly in Koalabata, Teyateyaneng district. It is about 89 km north of Lesotho’s capital, Maseru. To make the figurines, he worked from images from the 1934 Kirby tome, Musical instruments of the indigenous races of South Africa.

Clay figurine by Samuele Makoanyane representing a woman playing the moropa.
Kirby Collection, University of Cape Town

The figurines are registered in the Digital Humanities Collection of the University of Cape Town. They are named as: thomo musical bow, setolotolo musical bow, seketari (guitar), lesiba musical bow, lekolilo pipe, drum and moropa pipe.

The Morija Museum and Archives, Lesotho’s oldest and best-known museum, also has 33 Makoanyane clay figurines in its collection. The museum helped find living musicians to play on four of the instruments depicted.

The musicians

We recorded five musicians for the virtual exhibition. An older woman, Matlali Kheoana, plays the lekope (musical bow without reinforcement with oral resonance) and the sekebeku (jaw harp). The sekebeku is not technically part of the collection, but a modern-made instrument similar to the setolotolo in the collection.

Leabua Mokhele, an older man, and Molahlehi Matima, a younger man, both play lesiba (a musical bow without reinforcement with oral resonance). Malefetsane Paul Mabotsane and Petar Mohai, two young men, play the segankhulu (a single-string bowed lute with an oil canister resonator).

Although two instruments were dubbed, the performers played very differently. In the case of the segankhulu, they even built their instruments differently. Lesiba and Segankhulu always seem to attract younger and innovative players. But lekope is particularly threatened and Matlali Kheoana is probably one of the last performers of this instrument.

Music in the Mountain Kingdom, directed by photographer Paul Weinberg.

The live performances at the exhibition would have allowed the musicians to gain exposure and leverage their expertise. Other results could have included workshops and demonstrations at universities or as part of museum programs.

We are always working on creating learning and teaching materials for the study of Lesotho music. We hope that the repatriation of music and musical instruments through the exhibition and film will revitalize the interest of the Basotho and the pursuit of a sustainable indigenous musical culture.

The project would like to thank Steven Sack (independent curator), Jon Weinberg (principal consultant in Dijondesign exhibition) and Stephen Wessels (specialist in Dijondesign photogrammetry) for the virtual installation.


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Is the shofar really a musical instrument? – Before https://swedishmusicshop.com/is-the-shofar-really-a-musical-instrument-before/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/is-the-shofar-really-a-musical-instrument-before/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/is-the-shofar-really-a-musical-instrument-before/ Qol Tamid (Eternal Voice): The Shofar in ritual, history and culture. Edited by Jonathan L. Friedmann and Joel Gereboff Claremont Press, 358 pages, $ 27.99 Two kinds of horns mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. One, a metal trumpet, is described in detail. The description of the other, the shofar, is, shall we say, limited? Guess […]]]>

Qol Tamid (Eternal Voice): The Shofar in ritual, history and culture.

Edited by Jonathan L. Friedmann and Joel Gereboff

Claremont Press, 358 pages, $ 27.99

Two kinds of horns mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. One, a metal trumpet, is described in detail. The description of the other, the shofar, is, shall we say, limited? Guess which one has survived in continued use by Jews since then.

What is a shofar and how does it sound? Well it depends on who you ask. Beyond the certainty that a shofar is of animal origin, almost every other aspect imaginable is up for debate. For thousands of years to the sound of the shofar, Jews grappled with the what, why, when, how, where and who of the instrument.

Is the horn curved? Law? From a ram? Goat? Ibex? Oryx? Kudu? In fact, one of the only generally accepted agreements is that under no circumstances should a cow horn be used – even if the cow is considered kosher. This unfortunate episode of golden calf worship when Moses was otherwise occupied permanently disqualified eligibility for the bovine shofar. As a musician, I can personally attest to the lameness of cow horns on the sound spectrum of the shofar.

To help unravel the history and mysteries of this singular instrument (musical or otherwise), Jonathan Friedmann and Joel Gereboff have assembled ten essays to guide us through the practical and exalted issues involving these horns, filled with sufficient quotes to show the way for those who wish to pursue particular lines further. (Full disclosure: I am cited in the book as a composer, writer, and musicologist.) The level of musicality of the prose of these scholars varies. But the substance is still engaging and informative for those interested in researching the knowledge that can be found on shofarot (yes, the plural shows that the Hebrew name is feminine).

Although the biblical passages mention two words regarding the sound of the shofar, Friedmann and Gereboff write, “the exact nature of the sound is not entirely obvious, nor is it how the shofar should be sounded on different occasions. No passage details the species of animals to make a shofar. Rabbinical texts … [from earliest times] have developed and disagreed on various stipulations regarding the materials for the shofar, the specific character of the sounds and the liturgical dimensions of its use. In addition, local practices among different Jewish communities have emerged.

And then there are the esoteric Kabbalistic traditions, symbolic interpretations, and disputes over form and function. Is the shofar a musical instrument? Well, yes and no. “The shofar is the only musical instrument that has survived in Jewish practice since ancient times. All the musical instruments fell into the water after the destruction of the Temple. Why? “First, it’s a biological instrument. Unlike man-made items… Second, the rabbis did not include the shofar in the ban on playing musical instruments on holy days. The shofar was therefore musical but considered to be something other than a musical instrument – very Zen.

Jeremy Montagu provides an awesome, scholarly, and fairly in-depth walk through biblical and historical sources. Sometimes the shofar comes from a goat. But it must certainly come from a ram because it refers to the Aqedah (the binding of Isaac, stopped by the angel who orders Abraham to substitute the sacrifice of the ram in place of his son). Classifying the shofar as a kind of trumpet (as opposed to that other, made of metal), Montagu states that it is not known which of the two was used in Temple times to signal the Sabbath or holy days. But “in the Talmudic era”, he writes, “it was certainly the shofar”.

Marvin A. Sweeney’s essay offers a catalog of biblical sound signals for the shofar – of war, warnings, and worship. He addresses the emotional valence of the shofar, citing it both as a sound of joy – as in the Psalms – and also the various passages referring to fear and trembling – as in “Amos 3: 6 ‘When a shofar is sounded in a city, won’t the people tremble? The most famous combination of war, warning and worship of course crumbles the walls of Jericho. May I step in here that the NPR program ” Radiolab ”asked physicists to calculate the shofar forces needed here? (Miracle spoiler alert: sound, even though it was physically possible to muster a sufficient number of shofar players in a reasonable space to affect such a force, the sound would also have broken their bodies.)

The craziest and most wonderfully woolly essay of the book is written by Jeremy Philip Brown who delves into the “medieval kabbalistic ritual” of the shofar and explores the “theoerotic” nature of the instrument, dedicates his work in memoriam to Ornette Coleman, while Haim Ovadia’s essay on Sephardic theology and mysticism notes the fundamental differences between Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish traditions of the shofar: the latter is more concerned with “trembling” in the presence of God.

Meanwhile, Malcolm Miller contributes the main essay on shofars and concert works. After crediting Ruth Smith, who discovered the implicit calls of the shofar in Handel’s “Saul”, he goes through a host of other composers, crediting me for discovering the call of the shofar as the opening notes of ( and actually the main inspiration for) “” from Bernstein West Side Story. “

He also quotes two of my own compositions which include the shofarot: “Night and Dawn” for the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Brass Ensemble, in commemoration of the anniversary of the liberation of the Netherlands from the Nazi regime, and my Ceremonial concert for the equinox, a work conceived in space, the conclusion of which is written for septet shofar and bass drum. Alvin Curran, who probably holds the world record for compositions with shofar, is particularly noteworthy among the composers included. Then there is an opera by German composer Jörg Widmann, Babylon, which uses the shofar to “represent the old, but also the primitive, the beast, the uncivilized”. Israeli composer Shulamit Ran, in her opera “Between Two Worlds (The Dybbuk)”, describes the writing for shofarot in the scene of the attempt to exorcise the spirit of the deceased abandoned lover who had taken possession of the body of his future and had resided there. .

The latest essay in the collection, by Jonathan L. Friedmann, “From Stale to Silly to Sublime” is about the shofar in comics. In “Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen,” from 1964, for example, the titular cub journalist becomes “The Red-Headed Beatle of 1000 BC!” And apparently plays Beatles songs on a shofar and hand drum while wearing a red mop. wig (a plot point needed later). This comic would have us believe “that Beatles songs can be reproduced on limited musical instruments, represented by unflattering” Pwaah “,” Oowah “and” Pwaahh “sound effects.

Friedmann ends his investigation with a different comic book hero which is a total surprise: “The shofar gets his most complete comic book treatment through the character of Mal Duncan, the first black member” of DC Comics’ “Teen Titans” He writes. “After losing consciousness by an explosion, Duncan wakes up to the strange voice of Azrael, the angel of death, who has come to claim his soul. Duncan challenges Azrael to battle. The angel Gabriel acting as ‘arbiter’. Gabriel blows his horn, infusing Duncan with super strength to defeat the Angel of Death. Azrael says, “You beat me, so you live, for now! But I warn you, lose a fight against n ‘Anyone and you die! Gabriel gives Duncan the horn and tells him that blowing it will make him equal to any opponent. He reveals the shofar to Duncan in an almost mystical vision. This vision not only draws Jewish lore, but also Islamic and Christian.

The liminal sound of the shofar, between life and death; music or non-music; natural or human; the here and now or the mystic… Who will live and who will die? It is the kingdom of Qol Tamid.

A longer version of this review will appear in the annual publication of the Historical Brass Society.

Raphael Mostel is a New York-based composer and writer. Just before the pandemic, his music was performed by the Berliner Philharmoniker in Germany and by the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC.


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Kalimba: Popular options for extra beats in your music | Most Wanted Products https://swedishmusicshop.com/kalimba-popular-options-for-extra-beats-in-your-music-most-wanted-products/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/kalimba-popular-options-for-extra-beats-in-your-music-most-wanted-products/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 07:29:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/kalimba-popular-options-for-extra-beats-in-your-music-most-wanted-products/ A kalimba is a type of African thumb piano and has become a popular musical instrument nowadays. This instrument has a wooden base and the keys are made of metal. However, modern variations of a kalimba are often made using other materials in the base. You will need to run your fingers over the keys […]]]>
A kalimba is a type of African thumb piano and has become a popular musical instrument nowadays. This instrument has a wooden base and the keys are made of metal. However, modern variations of a kalimba are often made using other materials in the base. You will need to run your fingers over the keys to play this musical instrument. Since it is a portable and easy to learn musical instrument, it has gained immense popularity these days.

We have a list of some of the more popular kalimba or thumb piano options for you to choose from while shopping online. Choose an affordable and durable kalimba and enjoy playing and carrying your musical instrument wherever you go.

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When it comes to the kalimba, this handmade option can be one of the more reliable choices when shopping online. The base is made of mahogany wood and the bars or keys are made of carbon steel. So your musical instrument will be durable and give you the perfect sound whether you are practicing or playing.

With a length and width of less than 20cm each, you can easily carry this musical instrument and play soothing melodies whenever you want. This kalimba is available with silicone finger guards, adjustment hammer, stickers, bag and more.

Here is another affordable option in a kalimba that you can consider if you want to learn how to play the thumb piano. This 17 key inch piano has a sleek look that makes it different from other popular options. The fine texture and color will not fade easily. So you can even use this stylish kalimba in various stage performances.

The metal keys are sturdy and highly reinforced. So, they won’t easily lose their original shape and give you the perfect sound every time you play your musical instrument.

This affordable kalimba can be another good option that you can choose online to easily play melodious tunes. Available with kalimba learning book, tuning hammer, cloth bag and stickers, you don’t need to search for basic kalimba accessories when you buy this musical instrument online.

This sturdy kalimba weighs less than 500g and has a stable base. So you can play it without any audio disturbance.

If you don’t want to go for a traditional kalimba, this can be a good option that looks great and can easily meet your needs. This kalimba is made of high quality acrylic with ore steel bars to ensure durability and give a rich sound when playing your favorite musical tunes.

The surface of the base of this kalimba is resistant to scratches, moisture and water. So, you don’t have to worry about physically damaging your musical instrument due to wear and tear. You can even opt for this thumb piano as a gift for your loved ones.

If you want to go for a kalimba for beginner kids, this one is a good option to consider. Available with 8 keys, it is easier to learn than the popular 17-key options. This kalimba is available with a neck strap that will help you easily carry your musical instrument when traveling.

Easy to use, this kalimba will even allow you to compose your musical tunes as a beginner. You just need to have the right fondness for music.


Looking for more options in Kalimba? Explore here.

DISCLAIMER: Journalists from The Times of India were not involved in the production of this article.


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Music Drive collects musical instruments for Ohio kids https://swedishmusicshop.com/music-drive-collects-musical-instruments-for-ohio-kids/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/music-drive-collects-musical-instruments-for-ohio-kids/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 16:04:18 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/music-drive-collects-musical-instruments-for-ohio-kids/ The Columbus Music Commission has started a movement to donate musical instruments to children who otherwise might not have access to them. Columbus, Ohio – Giftof Music’s third annual campaign begins Saturday, collecting musical instruments for children in central Ohio throughout the weekend. The Columbus Music Commission has started a movement to donate musical instruments […]]]>

The Columbus Music Commission has started a movement to donate musical instruments to children who otherwise might not have access to them.

Columbus, Ohio – Giftof Music’s third annual campaign begins Saturday, collecting musical instruments for children in central Ohio throughout the weekend.

The Columbus Music Commission has started a movement to donate musical instruments to children who otherwise might not have access to them.

“I have seen underprivileged children pick up their instruments, give instructions and play in front of groups. The pride and value of being able to do it is believed. I do not. ”Tom Krouse, director of the Columbus Music Commission and CEO of Donatos.

Since the campaign began in 2019, approximately 1,100 musical instruments have been collected and donated to various organizations and schools in the city of Columbus.

“There are more and more needs and more and more school districts are interested, so we’re going to expand it to meet the needs there,” Crouse said.

We accept any used measuring instrument that can be easily repaired. The trip spans two weekends, August 28 and 29 and September 4 and 5. More information on where to get off and drive is available: Found here.

Follow the latest 10TV headlines below.

Music Drive collects musical instruments for Ohio kids

Source Link Music Drive Collects Musical Instruments for Ohio Kids


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Council revises noise ordinance | Local News https://swedishmusicshop.com/council-revises-noise-ordinance-local-news/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/council-revises-noise-ordinance-local-news/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/council-revises-noise-ordinance-local-news/ The city council discussed a proposal to change the city’s noise regulations during its August 17 session. And while there has been no formal vote on the matter, council generally agrees with the Planning and Zoning Commission that the use of a decibel standard should not be removed from the proposed requirements. by the staff. […]]]>

The city council discussed a proposal to change the city’s noise regulations during its August 17 session. And while there has been no formal vote on the matter, council generally agrees with the Planning and Zoning Commission that the use of a decibel standard should not be removed from the proposed requirements. by the staff.

At its July meeting, members of the Planning and Zoning Commission indicated that they were uncomfortable with the proposal to eliminate the use of a decibel-meter in the application of regulations, and council members seemed to agree, and suggested that staff keep the decibel meter as a tool for enforcing regulations.

Director of Development Services John Wesley said staff had reviewed orders from other towns and villages and worked with the sheriff’s office, city attorney and city attorney to prepare the order revised. Both prosecutor and MCSO captain Larry Kratzer agree the proposed new order should be easier to use and enforce than the existing order, Wesley said.

Kratzer told council that the MCSO will act on instructions from the city, however, he highlighted some of the concerns of MPs.

These include certification, maintenance and calibration of instruments; adequate training in the use and reading of the equipment; additional layers to the system and a requirement that the reading be taken from the location of the person with the complaint. He said it can often be in someone’s room at 2 a.m., making it an uncomfortable situation for everyone.

Staff had proposed removing specific decibel limits and replacing them with other objective criteria that can be used to determine whether noise from an activity is “unnecessary, unusual or unreasonable noise, excessive, disruptive and / or embarrassing “.

The main noise complaints the city has received in recent years have been associated with vacation rentals and events occurring at these homes, according to Wesley. He said the current noise ordinance has not been effective in addressing these issues. Staff are reviewing the current noise ordinance and have proposed changes that would make it easier to enforce noise offenses.

The proposed ordinance amendment provides two new definitions, one for “noise sensitive area” (property normally used for sleeping or normally used as a school, church, hospital or public library) and one for “Unruly Gathering”.

Councilor Peggy McMahon suggested broadening the criteria for noise sensitive areas.

The definition of noise sensitive area will help protect residential areas during the day and the definition of unruly gathering will be useful for application in vacation homes and other similar situations where large parties occur.

In addition, the section of the ordinance that eliminates the current use of the decibel approach creates the standards. This section of the ordinance establishes five conditions which can be considered as noise offenses if they occur at specific times. These are:

* Cause or permit noise by using, operating or permitting the playback of any electronic musical device, television set, amplifier, musical instrument or instrument, machine or apparatus used for the production, reproduction or emission of sound .

* Cause or allow any noise in connection with the loading or unloading or operation of any vehicle.

* Use or authorize the use of landscape maintenance equipment before 5 a.m.

* Use or allow the use of hand or power tools or any other machine or equipment not authorized by city code.

* Participate in or allow yelling, yelling, malicious or deliberate shouting or any other form of harsh vocalization by any person or group of people.

During the hours between 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., these conditions may be considered a violation if they:

* Produce any excessive, disruptive and / or annoying noise that is clearly audible at a distance of 200 feet or more from the sound source; and

b. Are continuous or intermittent for a period of at least 15 minutes; and

vs. To disturb the peace and quiet of a neighborhood or of a reasonable person of ordinary sensitivity.

During the hours between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m., these conditions may be considered a violation in noise sensitive areas if they meet the above criteria and disturb the peace of a neighborhood or at least two or more people do not. not occupying the same residence or physical location and are not exempt in this or any other city code or ordinance.

Section D of the ordinance deals with prohibited noise and states: “It is illegal for any person to make, allow, allow or create excessive noise, which disturbs the peace or tranquility of a neighborhood, a family or of a reasonable person of ordinary sensitivity. For the purposes of this paragraph, the determination of prohibited noise should be made on the basis of the circumstances existing at the time and place of the violation and the standards set out in Article 11-1-7 (c). In determining that noise is prohibited under this section, a reasonable person of ordinary sensitivity may include any deputy to the Maricopa County Sheriff or other city employees designated by the General Manager to enforce this section.

Section E of the ordinance deals with unruly gatherings and states: “A peace officer may reduce an unruly gathering by reasonable means, including, but not limited to, summoning and / or dispersing the persons participating. at the rally.

The noise ordinance has been presented for discussion only and staff will continue to work on the ordinance with comments provided. The Council and the Planning Commission will hold hearings and consider a final version at a later date.


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Free music sessions at Shanklin are scheduled thanks to the charity “Music For All” https://swedishmusicshop.com/free-music-sessions-at-shanklin-are-scheduled-thanks-to-the-charity-music-for-all/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/free-music-sessions-at-shanklin-are-scheduled-thanks-to-the-charity-music-for-all/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 11:19:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/free-music-sessions-at-shanklin-are-scheduled-thanks-to-the-charity-music-for-all/ Music for all This weekend (Saturday and Sunday) Islanders are invited to an event offering free music lessons. The event was canceled last year due to the pandemic, but now the charity behind the event, Music for all, is back for its “Learn to Play” event. The aim of the sessions is to encourage new […]]]>

Music for all

This weekend (Saturday and Sunday) Islanders are invited to an event offering free music lessons.

The event was canceled last year due to the pandemic, but now the charity behind the event, Music for all, is back for its “Learn to Play” event.

The aim of the sessions is to encourage new and old music makers to discover the joys and benefits of making music.

By offering free music lessons at venues across the county, in person or, for the first time, online, allows all ages and abilities to easily access and perform a wide range of musical instruments. their dreams of learning to play an instrument.

Supported by Music for All Ambassadors including Jools Holland, Jamie Cullum and Snow Patrol, Learn to Play Day ’21 will take place at the Shanklin Town Brass Band, Rylstone Gardens, Shanklin and offer free 10-15 minute music lessons.

More locations are expected to be announced in the coming weeks.

Tony Followell, Chairman of the Trustees of Music for All, said:

“The positive impact of learning to play a musical instrument is well known, and the past 18 months have highlighted the enormous benefits that music can offer to individual well-being and social cohesion. The universal appeal of music speaks to all of us and we want everyone to have the opportunity to experience music creation for themselves.

“As a charity, we understand that not everyone can afford instruments and lessons or have access to the services that would support their musical creation.

“We hope to spread joy and inspiration with the universal gift of music across the Isle of Wight.”

To find a free music lesson near you or to register online, visit https://musicforall.org.uk/learntoplayday/.

Or find the association on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/musicforallcharity


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Afghan music school is silent, its future is uncertain under the Taliban https://swedishmusicshop.com/afghan-music-school-is-silent-its-future-is-uncertain-under-the-taliban/ https://swedishmusicshop.com/afghan-music-school-is-silent-its-future-is-uncertain-under-the-taliban/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 17:50:37 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/afghan-music-school-is-silent-its-future-is-uncertain-under-the-taliban/ The doors of the Afghan National Institute of Music in Kabul are closed. The young students, teachers and teachers of the music school stay at home – they have reason to be afraid. According to founder and director Ahmad Sarmast, “armed people have entered school property” recently. He says they tried to steal the cars […]]]>

The doors of the Afghan National Institute of Music in Kabul are closed. The young students, teachers and teachers of the music school stay at home – they have reason to be afraid. According to founder and director Ahmad Sarmast, “armed people have entered school property” recently. He says they tried to steal the cars the school uses for transportation and destroyed musical instruments. Under the Taliban in the 1990s, music was strictly prohibited. Playing, selling, or even listening to music at home could get you in trouble.

Now, the future of ANIM is uncertain. With the disorder caused by the takeover of the city by the Taliban, “the situation is very unpredictable,” said Sarmast. “Things change very quickly in Kabul these days. “

Sarmast, who has spoken to NPR from Australia where he visits his family, is in constant contact with the school’s faculty. He says some students have not brought their instruments home, “for fear that if the Taliban search door to door, if the instruments are found in the house, it could cause them problems.” When he reported on the recent break-in, he said a local police officer “blamed our security guards for failing to open the school doors.”

It is the main music school in Afghanistan

With the help of donors, including the World Bank and the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM), ANIM opened in Kabul in 2010. Boys and girls study music and academics at the same. classroom. Students learn to play instruments from classical Afghan and Western traditions.

The school was touted as a great achievement in the effort to renew cultural life and the arts in Afghanistan. Ensembles from the school, including the all-female Zohra orchestra, have performed around the world. From Carnegie Hall in New York to the World Economic Forum in Davos, these young musicians, many from underprivileged communities, showed audiences a side of Afghanistan that often gets lost in the news.

Making music can have deadly consequences

Making music has long been a risky business in Afghanistan. Over the years, musicians have reportedly been threatened, kidnapped or killed. During one of the ANIM concerts in 2014, a suicide bomber sitting behind Sarmast exploded. Two people were killed and several others were injured. Sarmast lost his hearing for a while and had surgery to remove shrapnel from his head and body. “Fortunately, no student was injured or killed,” he said, “But of course the trauma they received from that bombing would probably have stuck with them their entire lives.”

While the Taliban have presented themselves to the media as less violent than they were in the 1990s, Sarmast is skeptical. “Today, the Taliban promise that they would respect human rights and respect diversity,” he said, “But (…) the video footage posted on social media is not very encouraging “.

Music entertains, strengthens and heals

Sarmast is concerned about the future of the school’s students. He says 10 of his graduates have received scholarships to study music in the United States, including pianist Elham Fanoos who attended Hunter College in New York City and recently graduated from the Manhattan School of Music with his master’s degree. Speaking from his home in New York City, Fanoos credits ANIM with “the reason I’m here”. He, too, is worried about the safety of everyone involved in the school and hopes that Afghans can continue to make music.

“I think a culture makes the country and gives the country the strength it needs and to represent the country,” says Fanoos. “Without … cultural activities, a country is completely incomplete.”

Sarmast appears determined not to let the Taliban hinder ANIM’s progress. The school had recently expanded into a larger building to accommodate more programs and ensembles. “Music isn’t just a type of entertainment. It’s not just an art,” he says. It is a “powerful force” to help Afghans heal “from years of civil war”.

Sarmast plans to reopen the Afghan National Institute of Music because, he says, “the nation needs it.” He hopes the international community will “keep an eye” to ensure that the Taliban keep their promises to respect human rights, “to ensure that the musical rights of the Afghan people [are] not knocked down again. “

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Over the past two decades, efforts have been made to renew cultural institutions and the arts in Afghanistan. One such success story is the Afghan National Institute of Music in Kabul. It is a place where boys and girls study music and academics in the same classrooms. The school’s ensembles have performed around the world, including at Carnegie Hall. And now this school is closed. Her future is uncertain, as NPR’s Elizabeth Blair reports.

ELIZABETH BLAIR, BYLINE: The Afghan National Institute of Music, or ANIM, has been celebrated around the world for the return of music to the country.

(MUSIC EXTRACT)

BLAIR: Founded by musicologist Dr Ahmad Sarmast, the school’s donors include the World Bank and the US and German governments. The British Royal Air Force airlifted musical instruments to the school when it opened. When the ANIM Orchestra performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, in 2013, CIA Director William Burns, then Assistant Secretary of State of the United States, introduced them.

(EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVED RECORD)

WILLIAM BURNS: Afghanistan’s rich musical traditions were once silenced by war and the Taliban regime. But when democracy returned to Afghanistan, Dr Ahmad Sarmast saw a chance to bring that tradition back to his country, founding what is now Afghanistan’s only music academy.

BLAIR: The musicians were students of the Afghan National Institute of Music and the Maryland Youth Orchestra, playing both traditional Afghan and Western instruments.

(MUSIC EXTRACT)

BLAIR: When the Taliban took power in 1996, music was banned. Musicians have reportedly been threatened, kidnapped or killed. This week with the return of the Taliban and Kabul in transition, the school is closed. Sarmast says some students haven’t brought their instruments home.

AHMAD SARMAST: They returned the musical instrument to us at school for fear that the Taliban would go door to door. If the instruments are in the house, it could cause them problems.

BLAIR: Sarmast told me about Australia, where he visits his family. He says he is in constant contact with the faculty of the school. Recently there was a burglary and some instruments were destroyed. Sarmast contacted a police officer in the area.

SARMAST: He blamed our security guards for failing to open the doors to the school. They weren’t supposed to open it.

BLAIR: We don’t know what the Taliban will do now. They have presented themselves to the media as less violent than they were in the 1990s. But Sarmast is skeptical.

SARMAST: Today the Taliban promise that they will respect human rights and respect diversity. But the video footage emerging on social media is not very encouraging.

BLAIR: He’s worried about the future of the students at the school. He says 10 of his graduates have received scholarships to study music in the United States, including pianist Elham Fanous.

(MUSIC EXTRACT)

BLAIR: Fanous attended Hunter College in New York City and recently graduated from the Manhattan School of Music with his Masters. He is concerned for the safety of everyone involved in ANIM and hopes the Afghans will continue to make music.

ELHAM FANOUS: Culture makes the country and gives the country the strength it needs to have and to represent the country. I think that without cultural activities the country is completely incomplete.

BLAIR: Dr Ahmad Sarmast says he plans to reopen the Afghan National Institute of Music because, he says, the country needs it. Elizabeth Blair, NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcription provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.


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