Music shop – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 21:18:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://swedishmusicshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Music shop – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ 32 32 An ’80s music experiment to keep BC teens from loitering is now a global practice https://swedishmusicshop.com/an-80s-music-experiment-to-keep-bc-teens-from-loitering-is-now-a-global-practice/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/an-80s-music-experiment-to-keep-bc-teens-from-loitering-is-now-a-global-practice/ In the mid-1980s, 7-Eleven store managers in British Columbia faced a problem they believed was hurting their bottom line: teenagers hanging out the door. The company felt that teenagers who lingered outside stores chased away other customers. BC management met with store staff and psychologists to brainstorm ideas to address the issue. The solution they […]]]>

In the mid-1980s, 7-Eleven store managers in British Columbia faced a problem they believed was hurting their bottom line: teenagers hanging out the door.

The company felt that teenagers who lingered outside stores chased away other customers. BC management met with store staff and psychologists to brainstorm ideas to address the issue.

The solution they came up with seemed surprisingly simple: Play classical or easy-listening music known as Muzak in parking lots to keep teenagers from hanging out.

The music was used in 10 stores in British Columbia and quickly spread to more than 150 7-Eleven stores in North America, according to Californian musicologist Lily Hirsch. In the years that followed, the practice of using music as a deterrent was used around the world.

WATCH | The Background Music Helping BC Convenience Stores Keep Loafers Away

The Background Music Helping BC Convenience Stores Keep Loafers Away

On September 3, 1990, CBC’s Ian Hanomansing visited a 7-Eleven in Richmond, BC, which was using a new tool to keep young people from loitering outside their store: Muzak.

Hirsch’s book Music in the Prevention and Suppression of Crime in the United Statesincludes a statement from the company indicating that it began the practice in several of its BC-based stores in 1985.

Hirsch writes that there are earlier examples of companies using music to keep people from lingering, but 7-Eleven says it’s “the first company to deliberately transform the core function of programmed bait music to repellent” and that it “appears to be the first company to have sanctioned such an approach as policy.”

“I think other people did it unknowingly around the same time, but 7-Eleven took ownership of it,” Hirsch told CBC News.

This approach, developed by 7-Eleven in British Columbia, continues to appear around the world. Hirsch says she regularly comes across media reports discussing variations on the same theme.

In 2012, the Washington Post wrote about classical music performed at the New York Port Authority. In 2019, a city in Florida collected watch out to blast the children’s song baby shark to prevent homeless people from congregating outside an event centre.

Opera music was played outside a reception area and safe consumption site in Prince George last year, a practice local social workers called ‘cruel’ .

WATCH | Repetitive opera music at the Prince George Visitor Center:

Opera music played to keep people away near the visitor center

Some outreach workers and volunteers are upset after the Fire Pit, a cultural drop-in center in downtown Prince George, started playing opera music as it tried to chase away people sitting outside the building, which also houses a safe consumption site.

7-Eleven did not respond to a request for comment on whether it was still playing music outside of any of its stores.

Victoria 7-Eleven criticized for using water drops

The convenience store chain recently came under fire after one of its stores in Victoria set up a system that deliberately leaked water from under an awning to deter people from loitering.

Advocates for the city’s vulnerable populations said the use of water drops to prevent vagrancy was demeaning, especially for the homeless.

A recent report in The Times-Colonist says the store, located on Quadra and Yates streets, has stopped using the tactic. CBC News has asked 7-Eleven for comment, but has not yet received a response.

Mark the space with music

Although the water drop deterrent didn’t last long, the company’s musical tactics seem to have lasted.

Hirsch said she first became interested in the subject after reading a 2006 news report about a suburb of Sydney, Australia using Barry Manilow music to repel teenagers.

Hirsch notes that most people have positive associations with music, making it a more subtle tool to avoid loafing. Dripping water is more intrusive than piping mandy through loudspeakers, she said.

“It was marking the space, communicating that this space isn’t yours, but they could use those positive associations with the music to create that kind of confusion and plausible deniability,” she said.

A 7-Eleven store in downtown Victoria has come under fire after installing a drip system to deter people from loitering. (Kathryn Marlow/CBC News)

In September 1990, CBC News visited a 7-Eleven store in Richmond, British Columbia, which played Muzak outside the store. Manager Kevin St. Denis said it was a hit with at least one neighboring household.

“They hear it in their bedroom and say it helps them fall asleep,” he said.

While the music played outside stores can be soft and melodious, Hirsch says the message it sends is loud and clear.

“Really what’s happening is you’re separating space.”

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Eagles Drumline shares the gift of music with the autism community https://swedishmusicshop.com/eagles-drumline-shares-the-gift-of-music-with-the-autism-community/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 18:24:39 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/eagles-drumline-shares-the-gift-of-music-with-the-autism-community/ Jeff Phipps, Educational Business Developer for Steve Weiss Music, said, “We always look forward to supporting the Philadelphia Eagles organization in their community engagement programs and want to use music and drumming to connect us all. This drumline sensory experience encapsulates the wonderful inclusiveness that music offers.” Students were instantly drawn to the sounds of […]]]>

Jeff Phipps, Educational Business Developer for Steve Weiss Music, said, “We always look forward to supporting the Philadelphia Eagles organization in their community engagement programs and want to use music and drumming to connect us all. This drumline sensory experience encapsulates the wonderful inclusiveness that music offers.”

Students were instantly drawn to the sounds of the instruments as the Eagles Drumline, with their Mapex drums draped in electric green lights, made their way down the center aisle of the assembly hall and onto the stage.

“Our belief at Mapex is that music is an essential and rewarding part of life. The Eagles Drumline unites fans through music and their work in the community, and we were proud to be involved in this sensory drumline experience. “said John Harvill. , Relations with the artists of Mapex Marching Arts.

Andy Moffatt, captain of the Eagles Drumline, was so proud of how the performance was received.

“Just to see the way the kids’ faces light up with the music in general, especially the drum line,” Moffatt said. “Sometimes it’s the vibrations they feel, and not even the sounds – they’ll just hit the drum and feel the vibration. To see the kids out there today moving through the aisles and dancing in their seats at all what we do, it just means the world.”

After the energetic performance, the students participated in breakout sessions throughout the day to continue exposing them to the music – a priority for the Eagles Autism Foundation, The Vanguard School and Steve Weiss Music.

“Having them choose us, The Vanguard School, to come and share this wonderful morning with our children and our staff is both heartwarming and exciting,” said Valley Forge Educational Services Executive Director Dr. Grace Fornicola. .

Each student was also sent home with a tambourine, so they always had access to music.

“To be able to witness the thrill of being so directly involved with the Eagles Autism Foundation and the Eagles organization in general is really a morale booster for our kids,” Fornicola said.

However, this wasn’t the first time the Eagles Autism Foundation had partnered with the school. The Vanguard School is a past recipient of Community Grants. Their grant funded Phin’s Cafe, a student-run cafe and snack bar located on campus. Students make sales as well as take and prepare orders, which teaches them important work, collaboration and leadership skills.

“It’s not that we write a check and wish them well. We really embrace them, bring them closer to the organization and find other opportunities to support them,” Hammond said.

It’s just another step forward for Hammond and the staff of the Eagles Autism Foundation.

“It’s not just about what we do at Lincoln Financial Field or who we invest in – it’s about digging in and being part of the community, being alongside them,” Hammond added. “It’s just about making sure they know we have their back and that when we get the chance to bring something new to their community, we will and we’ll provide music, inclusion, excitement and celebrating with our fans.”

“Awareness in action.” It’s a phrase coined by the Eagles Autism Foundation and it’s the perfect representation of how the mission is executed on a daily basis.

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The R&B Club brings soul music to life in Washington https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-rb-club-brings-soul-music-to-life-in-washington/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 12:39:22 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-rb-club-brings-soul-music-to-life-in-washington/ Comment this story Comment Before Verzuz and Club quarantine, four local music lovers were hosting their own discussions about the legacy of a genre whose relevance has been questioned in recent years. Since February 2018, Marcus K. Dowling, Julian Kimble, Ashley-Dior Thomas and Justin Tinsley have hosted the R&B club – a monthly book club-style […]]]>

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Before Verzuz and Club quarantine, four local music lovers were hosting their own discussions about the legacy of a genre whose relevance has been questioned in recent years. Since February 2018, Marcus K. Dowling, Julian Kimble, Ashley-Dior Thomas and Justin Tinsley have hosted the R&B club – a monthly book club-style get-together for fellow soul music enthusiasts at Songbyrd Music House.

At the R&B Club, the “language we all understand” that Stevie Wonder sang about in “Mr Dukeis not dismissed as “niche” or “pass”. When a recording of Tevin Campbell’s “Can We Talk” is paused too soon, a singalong breaks out to end it. When the panel asks which version of Diddy’s “I Need a Girl” is better, a thorough discussion is guaranteed.

“I was really tired of people saying R&B is dead, non-existent, or fading away,” said Thomas, a small business operations consultant. “I don’t understand where this is coming from. It’s such a lazy conversation. R&B is sometimes treated like it’s music’s cousin rather than mom or dad.

The hosts came up with the idea for the events after attending Songbyrd’s Classic Album Sundays series. They sought to combine their mutual admiration for the genre with their respective strengths – Dowling’s knowledge of DC’s musical history, Kimble’s flair for debate, Tinsley’s talent for sharing cultural context and the expertise of Thomas in terms of productivity – to create a “holistic image” of R&B for the public. .

With year-long themes such as “R&B Albums of the 90s” and “R&B Legends” as a framework, hosts select a topic and examine how that artist’s personal journey, lyricism, vocal ability or build quality continue to make the heart of rhythm and blues beat faster today. Using a chronologically organized playlist as a guide, hosts contribute to conversations with intimate stories, steadfast opinions, and little-known facts about the topics. They keep an open mic handy to encourage members of the public to also share their connections. The sessions, which may have started as a gathering of like-minded music enthusiasts, have blossomed into a safe space for fans who have become family, according to Dowling.

“You walk into this room and your true human passion is on display at some point during these two hours,” said Dowling, who moved to Nashville during the pandemic to work as a country music reporter for the Tennessean. “Something very organic to who you are as a person comes out. … You will probably cry. You’ll laugh, and something about you that you don’t want the world to know will probably come out. We have a common experience.

These local record stores give you an analog break from a digital world

Kimble, a freelance writer whose work has appeared in The Post and other publications, believes he and his co-hosts are nurturing guests’ desire to “feel something” deeper than the soundtrack to their endless brunch du weekend. “In a city where people can go to multiple places, do the exact same thing, I don’t know if there’s anything like the R&B Club in DC,” he said. “That’s what people are drawn to.”

This year’s series is focused on songwriters and producers. At October’s Raphael Saadiq event, best friends and new attendees Montez Freeman from Southeast and Justin Schofield from District Heights immediately “felt a sense of community” in the audience.

“These are my people,” Freeman said. “I didn’t expect to see so many people interested in this kind of obsession with music. I no longer felt like a nerd or an outsider.

Schofield appreciated the hosts acknowledging performers he feels are not appreciated enough by the general public.

“There’s so much music from then and now,” Schofield said. “Let’s blow the dust off this thing and play it. Let’s talk about what we have in the past and make sure living Again.”

After a brief hiatus during the pandemic, the club relaunched in July 2022 spotlighting Missy Elliott. The rapper-songwriter even co-signed the “fun” of the event herself on Twitter. For Thomas, Elliott’s comment only reaffirmed what the late record executive Andre Harrel told him during a chance encounter in March 2018.

“I showed him a photo from our Jodeci event and he was like, ‘Oh, you have something going on here. I’ve never heard of that,” Thomas said. “And I knew. I don’t care if 10 people or three people came every month after that. Andre Harrel tells us that we have something going on. That’s all I needed. We take off.

Harrell founded Uptown Records, which was home to acclaimed R&B artists like Al B. Of course! and Mary J. Blige, including “What’s the 411?” The album was covered by the R&B Club in April 2018. Thomas said the music mogul was surprised that people cared enough to review R&B, let alone discuss minute details like seeing a sophisticated singer like Blige don combat boots and a backwards baseball cap while singing on “True Love.”

At the R&B Club, yes. Southeast resident Charles Nelson likes that he respects DC’s musical heritage as well.

“Like a lot of Washington natives, we love hip-hop, we really love go-go. But deep down, we’re R&B bosses,” Nelson said. “Everybody in this town knows Marvin Gaye. , Raheem DeVaughn, Donny Hathaway, Roberta Flack and all those people who [were] born here, have ties to this city. We are naturally [an] R&B city.

Kimble backed up that point at the Saadiq event, when he recounted seeing the multi-instrumentalist during a two-night show at the 9:30 Club. According to Kimble, Saadiq shared his affection for the go-go cover of his song “Still Ray” by a local act backyard strip. “The second night, [they] came out and did the song with him,” Kimble said. “[D.C.] is an R&B town because it’s just in its DNA.

For Alisha Edmonson and Joe Lapanthe owners of Songbyrd and his brother Byrdland record store, the R&B Club lets them brainstorm clever ways to connect with audiences.

“According [who] the artist is, I’ll be like, ‘Oh, maybe there’s a record that I can help [them] give’ or ‘Is there a cool R&B show?’ “said Lapon. “I [helped] they give tickets to Alex Isley and Maxwell. Because it’s a group of dedicated R&B fans, even though we’re celebrating Raphael Saadiq, we know that crowd cares about Isley and Maxwell.

Before the pandemic, sessions were held in the dimly lit basement of Songbyrd’s former location in Adams Morgan. The darkness and closeness fueled the confidence of the guests who spontaneously stood up and danced or began to sing, shielded from critical gaze. At the new Songbyrd near Union Market, guests sit at large tables in a converted, brightly lit warehouse. But Edmonson thinks the uniqueness of the community listening experience remains.

“Music is the tempo we create, and that’s what makes it intimate,” Edmonson said. “Space is a blank canvas for the vibe people want to bring to it.”

At the end of the Saadiq event, the hosts announced that the November edition would spotlight Virginia Pharrell Williams, and gasps and cheers echoed through the room. Tinsley, senior culture editor at ESPN’s Andscape, thinks those heartfelt reactions are what make the experience special.

“I’m never impressed when I look at the crowd,” Tinsley said. “You love music, but you love hearing people talk about their connection to music. I think that’s the genesis of what great music is, [and] really good R&B. We always want this type of connection because you know when a connection is real, [and] you know when a connection is made. I do not think so [there’s] nothing about this club that is made. The R&B Club is one of the biggest gifts DC has right now.

The R&B Club is held the second Sunday of each month at Songbyrd, 540 Penn St. NE. “Diary of an R&B Songwriter and Producer: Pharrell” will take place November 13 from noon to 2 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door and include a drink.

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Jessy Wilson on ‘The Woman Kin’s “Keep Rising” and Her Rich Music Career: NPR https://swedishmusicshop.com/jessy-wilson-on-the-woman-kins-keep-rising-and-her-rich-music-career-npr/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 11:55:41 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/jessy-wilson-on-the-woman-kins-keep-rising-and-her-rich-music-career-npr/ “I want to see more opportunities for women with a message, with dark skin,” says Jessy Wilson, whose uplifting “Keep Rising” with Angelique Kidjo closes the historic epic. The female king. Marie-Caroline Russel hide caption toggle caption Marie-Caroline Russel “I want to see more opportunities for women with a message, with dark skin,” says Jessy […]]]>

“I want to see more opportunities for women with a message, with dark skin,” says Jessy Wilson, whose uplifting “Keep Rising” with Angelique Kidjo closes the historic epic. The female king.

Marie-Caroline Russel


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Marie-Caroline Russel


“I want to see more opportunities for women with a message, with dark skin,” says Jessy Wilson, whose uplifting “Keep Rising” with Angelique Kidjo closes the historic epic. The female king.

Marie-Caroline Russel

The female king — by director Gina Prince-Blythewood historical epic starring Viola Davis about a powerful army of West African female warriors protecting their kingdom – is only the second film with a black female director to open at number one at the box office. The film’s fame means millions have had the chance to hear the song playing over the closing credits, but what has received far less attention is the story of a heartbreaking triumph tied to that fearless pop anthem, “Keep Rising.”

Jessy Wilson wrote and recorded it with producer Jeremy Lutito in the studio behind her East Nashville, Tennessee home during the summer of 2020. She barely touched a microphone after that, quickly drifting away from writing of songs. What brought her back one day in early October to that same small studio — and to the music — was the chance to truly embrace the song’s role in a powerful movie. With no label budget behind her, she had decided to create a royally deliberate acoustic version for a simple, live music video. “After all this time, I hope I’m like a pro, it’s like riding a bike,” Wilson explained after arriving at the scene and packing up her bag.

She certainly seemed in her element that day on set, not only the lead performer who knew her instrument and how to apply it to the supple insistence of the verses and the more fiery exhortation of the chorus, but the one leading the arrangement of the accompanying vocal trio. , too. Once she got the vocal takes she was looking for, finished lip-syncing for the videographers, and sat on the same couch where she came up with “Keep Rising,” she was a compelling storyteller.

Youtube

The decision to briefly give up music was a big one for Wilson. She’s not a fan. By age 8, she had already convinced her mother and an agent that she had the vocal ability, stage presence, and motivation to start auditioning for off-Broadway roles. During his participation in LaGuardia, the Notoriety-famous performing arts high school in Manhattan, she lied about her age to land a regular gig at a coffee shop. “They all thought it was weird,” she recalled, “like, ‘Why does she come with her mom every weekend?’ Eventually I told them the truth, but for a while I just told them I was a student at NYU, because I really wanted that experience.”

She was hungry to learn the studio side of her craft when john legend hired her as a backup singer right out of high school. “I think I had only sung with him for about four weeks. And I said, ‘Can I come with you to the studio, please? I’ll be a fly on the wall. I won’t do no noise. . I just want to come,” Wilson said. “He was like, ‘Yeah, absolutely.’ “

It’s Wilson who provides resplendent, cooing echoes on Legend’s bossa nova-tinged 2006 track “MaxineShe branched out into songwriting with his encouragement, eventually providing cuts to other major R&B stars. Wilson thought she might become one of them herself, but didn’t. kept coming up against colorism in the industry: “Being a dark-skinned black woman, you know, being told it’s not marketable, being told it’s not worldwide, being told that no one could really relate to me because of my complexion.”

“It was a very new concept for me, because back home, my mom and dad taught me to love my complexion, to love my Darkness, to love my features that look like African features,” he said. she continued. “It was a rude awakening when I realized that wasn’t the world’s view and that somehow black people are true victims of white supremacy in terms of how we see ourselves, even in the mirror. When you have so much inside of you, it is very painful too, because you are waiting for someone to give you that [professional] down, and you expect someone to see you that way [as an artist].”

After accompanying Legend to Nashville on a songwriting expedition, Wilson decided to give the city a try, moving in 2013. In songwriting circles, Wilson was introduced to his white musical partner Kallie North and to their soulful roots rock duo. muddy magnolias was a revelation for an adjacent country scene that made more room for black music radiation than black music-manufacturers. “These first two months of life here,” Wilson said, “I walked around Music Row over and over, and said, ‘God make me a pioneer.'”

With Muddy Magnolias, Wilson finally landed the recording contract she was working for, a success that she said was twofold. “The [vocal] mix was second to none. It does something to the heart when you see a black girl and a white girl up there singing in harmony, what it means to the spirit,” Wilson said. “But also, you have to think about the business side. It wasn’t a gimmick for us, but I think the industry found it easy to remember.”

Country singer-songwriter Brittney Spencer took note of the mark left by her black predecessor when she was an employee of a health food store that regularly filled Wilson’s juice orders, and the recently called to tell him. “I think the opportunities that a lot of artists like me can get right now is because little by little people have been sowing seeds,” Spencer observed in a separate interview. “And even though this space wasn’t necessarily ready five, seven years ago, man, I was there and I looked at it and I didn’t forget.”

When Muddy Magnolias broke up, Wilson began to find his voice as a solo artist on the sensually sophisticated and atmospheric side of rock and soul with the Patrick Carney-produced album. Phase. She wanted to complicate the perception of her as “just that big singer.” “Phase gave me an opportunity to shut up,” Wilson said. “People underestimate the power of being silent. I made an intentional decision never to open my voice beyond a certain place on my album, because I had sung all my life and wanted to hear the intricacies of my voice on record. … I wanted people to hear what I had to say.”

Around the same time, Tyler the Creator found Wilson on social media, urging him to sing on his album IGO; he hadn’t been able to get his voice out of his head since he’d heard it escape from “Maxine”. But those professional landmarks gave way to a series of personal losses. Wilson’s beloved grandmother passed away and his father, a New York City healthcare worker, barely survived COVID-19 at the start of the pandemic. Then she and her husband lost a pregnancy.

“Unfortunately after four months we lost our child,” Wilson said. “I felt like I was in a hole. I kept looking for things to hold on to, but nothing was pulling me out. It’s hard to even really communicate or even think about those times, because desperation was just…” She trailed off, unable to find sufficient words.

In her aggravated grief, it became difficult for Wilson to deliver the songs she owed to her publisher. One of them she submitted was “Keep Rising”. “When I wrote the song, I was talking to black people,” she explained. “There’s a part of the lyrics that I also talk about myself: ‘I’ve been walking for so long. How far is it to get to where we’re going?’ Like, how long do we have to wait in America? How long does Jessy have to wait? When will we be considered enough? When will I be considered enough?

At the time, Wilson didn’t have much hope of anything coming out of this song, or any of the others she wrote. She lost her publishing contract in early 2021 and turned to visual art. But on what would have been her baby’s due date in 2022, she received some big news. The director of The female kingPrince-Bythewood, had originally considered Terence BlanchardThe entire film’s soundtrack score, but her search for the right music to transport the audience away from the closing scene had led her to “Keep Rising.”

Sent out a collection of unreleased tracks to listen to, Prince-Bythewood found in Wilson “exactly what I wanted audiences to feel. It gets you up and moving. It felt like it was written for the movie.”

“When I wrote the song, I was talking to black people,” Wilson says of “Keep Rising.”

Marie-Caroline Russel


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Marie-Caroline Russel


“When I wrote the song, I was talking to black people,” Wilson says of “Keep Rising.”

Marie-Caroline Russel

“One of the things that excites me the most,” she added, “is that I love hearing Jessy’s story and who she is as an artist, where she was at the when that call came in. I love that we have the power to uplift artists who deserve it. And Jessy, her voice, the depth that she brings to her work, absolutely deserves this opportunity.

Prince-Bythewood asked Wilson to adapt two lyrics to the period of the film and accept a feature from the legendary singer Angelique Kidjo, originally from the region where the film is set, then known as the Kingdom of Dahomey. “She’s the First Lady of Benin, basically,” notes the director, “so important to empowering girls in Africa, an incredible activist. I wanted her voice and I kind of wanted to bridge the gap, America and Africa.”

Wilson didn’t mind making these adjustments at all. “I feel so connected to the intent of their mission for what they want this film to accomplish in our industries,” she said with serene conviction. “I want to see more opportunities for women who have a message, who are dark skinned. And so if I can somehow open doors, then I feel like I can cling to that, the possibility of that, because my new purpose.”

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In pictures: Presto Music, a thriving and popular Leamington shop, moves to new premises https://swedishmusicshop.com/in-pictures-presto-music-a-thriving-and-popular-leamington-shop-moves-to-new-premises/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 12:54:36 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/in-pictures-presto-music-a-thriving-and-popular-leamington-shop-moves-to-new-premises/ Leamington’s popular and successful store, Presto Music, has moved to new, modern premises in the town centre. Presto has been trading in the city for 36 years and is one of the UK’s leading sources of sheet music, classical and jazz recordings, musical instruments, accessories and musical gifts. Agents based in Leamington Wareing & Cie […]]]>

Leamington’s popular and successful store, Presto Music, has moved to new, modern premises in the town centre.

Presto has been trading in the city for 36 years and is one of the UK’s leading sources of sheet music, classical and jazz recordings, musical instruments, accessories and musical gifts.

Agents based in Leamington Wareing & Cie obtained the lease for the new premises for Presto.

The new site is a 7,000 square foot purpose-built location and will continue to stock the wide range of instruments, accessories, recordings, printed music and gifts that music lovers have enjoyed over the years. with an expanded range of next-step instruments. , specifically for the advanced beginner and beyond.

Undefined: readMore

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Escape Rockers Enumclaw Are Ready To Be Everyone’s Favorite New Band https://swedishmusicshop.com/escape-rockers-enumclaw-are-ready-to-be-everyones-favorite-new-band/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/escape-rockers-enumclaw-are-ready-to-be-everyones-favorite-new-band/ Now the sweat has dried. So are the signatures on the stacks of records the guys from Washington’s hottest band Enumclaw sold during what frontman Aramis Johnson calls the best local young indie rocker show so far. day – a Friday night album release earlier this month in a crowded Easy Street Records, a rite […]]]>

Now the sweat has dried. So are the signatures on the stacks of records the guys from Washington’s hottest band Enumclaw sold during what frontman Aramis Johnson calls the best local young indie rocker show so far. day – a Friday night album release earlier this month in a crowded Easy Street Records, a rite of passage for the hometown, is making headway.

Between a wonky power strip, a brief shortage of tape, and a sliding drum kit, it nearly went off the rails. In what might have been the biggest show of support for the rumored rising quartet in western Washington, a friend of Johnson’s cousin knelt in front of the bass drum to physically hold her in place during a fun and frenzy that, for about an hour, transformed the West Seattle boutique into the coolest punk house on California Avenue Southwest. Three weeks later, the dude’s ears are probably still ringing.

“The drummer needed so much help tonight,” jokes LaDaniel Gipson, the soft-spoken, steady-handed drummer in question who is perched on the ledge of the parking lot outside Easy Street as cars whiz by. pace.

Still surrounded by friends who made the trip from Tacoma, sitting among the guys from Enumclaw decompressing after an adrenaline-filled set and meeting each other is like being in the post-game locker room with the winning team, recounting how calamity nearly cost them the game while popping champagne (or in this case, passing around a bag of Doritos), while taking it. Every few minutes a car full of friends or fans passes by – either leaving the show or heading to the nearby Benbow room where the band will continue their ‘Save the Baby’ release party with a DJ set late into the night – shouting inside jokes and unleashing a stream of festive horns.

“I can’t believe we were there for 45 minutes straight, just like signing, signing, signing,” guitarist Nathan Cornell says with bewildered vertigo. “Weird. It’s a feeling of gratitude.

The past year and a half has brought a wave of new experiences for accelerated band Tacoma that caught the attention of the DC music community (and the indie world at large) when 2021’s “Jimbo Demo” EP released. is unrolled music blogs are on fire before they even played a show. Since then, Enumclaw has graced required Seattle festivals, signed to Fat Possum imprint Luminelle Recordings, and landed desirable opening slots on tour with an eclectic mix of bigger acts, including their current run with Illuminati hotties. favorites of “tender punk”, which ends on November 19. at the Neptune Theatre.

Meanwhile, there has been a steady increase in the number of Enumclaw t-shirts bearing their flashing slogan, “Best Band Since Oasis”, spotted on local rock shows. Different from everything the western Washington rock scene has seen in recent years.

Despite all the hype, the band who formed after a night of karaoke at Bob’s Java Jive insists they felt no pressure to deliver as they set about recording their first feature footage in Tacoma.

“It happened so fast, we didn’t really stop to think about it,” says Johnson, the amiable singer who sports a hard-to-miss mustache and his heart on his sleeve. We were just like ‘We are the [expletive] and this album will be the [expletive].’ We were in the studio jumping like we were about to sell 50 million copies and if it’s not going triple diamond, we’ve done something wrong.

The triple diamond may be a tall order (even for the Taylor Swifts of the world), but Gipson’s “no-jump” claim certainly rings true. From the melodious jangle-and-fuzz on songs like “2002” to the more acoustically closer “Apartment,” there’s no filler on their impressive debut album peppered with Tacoma-area references.

Johnson’s deeply personal and direct lyrics flow from his lips with the intimacy of a house party on the back porch, confiding in listeners his most vulnerable and easily relatable emotions. Beyond Johnson’s words and wispy, non-choirboy vocals, the album’s intimate feel is in part due to its home recording at ALMA, Tacoma’s venue and restaurant complex with a recording studio. in-house recording, and a quick chemistry with producer Gabe Wax, chosen for his work with pensive indie rock songwriter Soccer Mommy. Every night at 6 p.m., Johnson’s mother would drop by the studio with dinner.

While many songs come from a dark place – self-reflection in the midst of an unhappy romance (“Save the Baby”) or the absence of a close friend struggling with schizophrenia (“Park Lodge”) – Enumclaw’s live sets have increasingly taken on a fun punk-rock intensity thanks in large part to bassist Eli Edwards, the band’s screaming spark plug, who is also Johnson’s younger brother.

“The music that matters most to me is music that I can see myself in,” Johnson says. “I try to write from this place. …And we’re a rock band, you know. We are not here to cry together. I mean, if you want to shed some thug tears, that’s fine too, but we’re here to have a good time.

Less than two years after releasing their debut single, “Fast N All,” before Edwards had even learned his instrument, this combo is clearly connecting with people.

Johnson recalls two encounters with fans at a particular concert in Denver “that started to put things into perspective for me.” Before the show, they met someone who had driven several hours to be there, rushing to a hotel and making a weekend just to see them.

“It was pretty cool,” Johnson says. “And then when we came out on stage, there were these two black guys in front of the crowd and one of them was wearing a ‘Best Band Since Oasis’ t-shirt. He must have bought it before the show. After the gig, we talked to him, he’d brought his cousin and he said, ‘You guys inspired us to start a band. We didn’t know we could be in a band until we saw you do it It was really special.

Before forming Enumclaw, Johnson, who grew up in Lakewood, made a name for himself as an underground DJ/party organizer on the local hip-hop scene, founding the popular Toe Jam series. Tacoma rapper/producer Khris P remembers first meeting Johnson in 2014 at eTc Tacoma, a local clothing brand with a downtown boutique that has become one of the city’s cultural hubs.

“This little guy walks up to me and says, ‘Hey, give me a beat. I’m gonna be famous, I’m gonna be a star. I looked at him, I was like, ‘Who’s the [expletive] are you? ‘” As the two grew closer over the years, Khris says it was clear Johnson was destined “to do something big.”

“Aramis has such charisma and determination that it’s hard to deny,” Khris says. “Just meeting him and getting to know him, you could tell he was ready for something.”

Johnson has never been hampered by his lifelong desire to be famous. Such an admission would have been old-fashioned in some of the past rock movements that resonate through Enumclaw’s music, but in the world of contemporary indie rock, a bit of wholesome bravado sounds refreshing and honest.

One of Enumclaw’s greatest strengths in his young career has been his ability to organically split the bills with a wide range of acts, from big gigs with chillwave graduate Toro y Moi (who wore an Enumclaw shirt during his Capitol Hill Block Party set on the main stage) and touring with shoegazers Nothing, to local shows with the mainstays of Tacoma rap GLENN and Khris P or Olympia hardcore GAG ​​pivots.

For Edwards, it’s been a joy to see how different crowds react differently to the same songs. “Playing with a bunch of different headliners and playing in front of a bunch of different crowds will eventually lead to us having a really cool and diverse audience,” he says.

“We want to bring monoculture back,” Johnson jokes. “We are the group for everyone.”

Illuminati hotties with Enumclaw

8 p.m. Nov. 19, Neptune Theater, 1303 NE 45th St., Seattle; $18, stgpresents.org.

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A behind-the-scenes look at the world premiere of San Diego Opera’s opera “El Último Sueño de Frida y Diego” https://swedishmusicshop.com/a-behind-the-scenes-look-at-the-world-premiere-of-san-diego-operas-opera-el-ultimo-sueno-de-frida-y-diego/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 12:45:21 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/a-behind-the-scenes-look-at-the-world-premiere-of-san-diego-operas-opera-el-ultimo-sueno-de-frida-y-diego/ On Saturday, the San Diego Opera will present “El Ultimo Sueño de Frida y Diego” (“Frida and Diego’s Last Dream”), a Spanish-language opera making its world premiere at the San Diego Civic Theater. Co-written by Latin Grammy-winning composer Gabriela Lena Frank and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and librettist Nilo Cruz, the two-hour opera will retell the […]]]>

On Saturday, the San Diego Opera will present “El Ultimo Sueño de Frida y Diego” (“Frida and Diego’s Last Dream”), a Spanish-language opera making its world premiere at the San Diego Civic Theater.

Co-written by Latin Grammy-winning composer Gabriela Lena Frank and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and librettist Nilo Cruz, the two-hour opera will retell the Kahlo-Rivera love story of a new and unique point of view – the afterlife.

Beginning in August, the San Diego Opera gave Union-Tribune photographer Nelvin C. Cepeda access to various stages of the opera’s development, during which he was able to photograph electricians , decorators, stagehands, costume designers, musicians and actors at work behind the scenes.

The entrance to the San Diego Opera Scenic Studio.

Scenic artist Courtney Ware works on one of the set design props for

At the San Diego Opera Scenic Studio on August 30, 2022, scenic artist Courtney Ware works on one of the set design props for “El Último Sueño de Frida y Diego” (“Frida and Diego’s Last Dream”).

San Diego Opera Scenic Studio workers assemble a large temporary floor covering.

San Diego Opera Scenic Studio workers assemble a large temporary floor covering.

Chief Carpenter Cory Klinge works on one of the set design props for

Head Carpenter Cory Klinge works on one of the set design props for “El Último Sueño de Frida y Diego” (“Frida and Diego’s Last Dream”).

    Jessica Harriman Baxter (foreground) and Melissa Nalbach paint props for

Jessica Harriman Baxter (foreground) and Melissa Nalbach paint props for “El Último Sueño de Frida y Diego” (“Frida and Diego’s Last Dream”).

Jessica Harriman Baxter paints one of the great stage props.

Jessica Harriman Baxter paints one of the great stage props.

Costume designer Eloise Kazan examines fabrics at the San Diego Opera Costume Shop.

Costume designer Eloise Kazan, part of the Mexican creative team hired to create the new opera, looks at fabrics at the San Diego Opera’s costume shop.

At the San Diego Opera Costume Shop, Anastasia Pautova pins a costume.

At the San Diego Opera Costume Shop, Anastasia Pautova pins a costume.

Anastasia Pautova does needlework for a costume.

Anastasia Pautova does needlework for a costume.

Costume shop manager Anastasia Pautova creates an original sewing pattern for a costume.

Costume shop manager Anastasia Pautova creates an original sewing pattern for a costume.

Raven Winter is working on creating a skeleton design for one of the costumes in the San Diego Opera Costume Shop.

Raven Winter is working on creating a skeleton design for one of the costumes in the San Diego Opera Costume Shop.

Maria De La Mora, one of the drapers at the San Diego Opera, checks costumes for last-minute fittings and adjustments.

Maria De La Mora, one of the drapers at the San Diego Opera, checks costumes for last-minute fittings and adjustments.

Jason Crutchfield uses a hacksaw to cut several pieces of pipe to use in crafting props.

Jason Crutchfield uses a hacksaw to cut several pieces of pipe to use in crafting props.

Set designer Jorge Ballina (left) reviews props with San Diego Opera Technical Director Tim Wallace.

Set designer Jorge Ballina (left) reviews props with San Diego Opera Technical Director Tim Wallace at the company’s Scenic Studio. Ballina’s design is intentionally two-dimensional, so it has the same flat canvas style as Frida Kahlo’s paintings.

San Diego Opera Production Manager Joan Foster briefs the approximately 50 stagehands at the San Diego Civic.

San Diego Opera Production Manager Joan Foster briefs the approximately 50 stagehands at the San Diego Civic Theater.

Michael

Michael “Mongo” Mogla lowers and raises the stage curtains.

The stagehands move the crates of equipment to the orchestra elevator to be taken under the stage.

The stagehands move the crates of equipment to the orchestra elevator to be taken under the stage.

The cast of

The cast of “El Último Sueño de Frida y Diego” (“Frida and Diego’s Last Dream”) rehearses at Bread & Salt in Logan Heights.

Director Lorena Maza works with Guadalupe Paz and Federico De Michelis.

Director Lorena Maza works with Guadalupe Paz and Federico De Michelis.

Bandleader Roberto Kalb leads the cast during a recent rehearsal.

Bandleader Roberto Kalb leads the cast during a recent rehearsal.

Assistant stage manager Megan Coutts updates the scores.

Assistant stage manager Megan Coutts updates the scores.

San Diego Opera: ‘El Último Sueño de Frida y Diego’ (‘The Last Dream of Frida and Diego’)

When: 7.30 p.m. Saturday and 1 and 4 Nov. 2 p.m. 6 Nov.

Where: San Diego Civic Theater, 1100 Third Ave., San Diego

Tickets: $19 to $315

Call: (619) 533-7000

On line: sdopera.org

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Boston Public Radio Full Show: October 21, 2022 https://swedishmusicshop.com/boston-public-radio-full-show-october-21-2022/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 20:29:18 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/boston-public-radio-full-show-october-21-2022/ We opened the show by taking phone calls during Thursday’s gubernatorial debate between Democrat Maura Healey and Republican Geoff Diehl to get our listeners’ thoughts on the respective candidates ahead of the Nov. 8 general election. The World’s Tibisay Zea and Rafael Ulloa, Executive Vice President of Content for El Planeta Media, discussed their new […]]]>

We opened the show by taking phone calls during Thursday’s gubernatorial debate between Democrat Maura Healey and Republican Geoff Diehl to get our listeners’ thoughts on the respective candidates ahead of the Nov. 8 general election.

The World’s Tibisay Zea and Rafael Ulloa, Executive Vice President of Content for El Planeta Media, discussed their new project, “Salud,” produced by GBH News. The To displaywhich is presented in Spanish and focuses on health issues within the Latino community, airs Saturdays at 9:30 am on GBH 89.7.

Michael Curry has raised concerns about the low percentage of people receiving COVID-19 booster shots. He ended with an update on King Boston, the group behind the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial coming to Boston Common and changing their name to Embrace Boston. Micahel Curry is president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers. He is also a member of the NAACP National Board of Directors, where he chairs the council’s Advocacy and Policy Committee.

Jeff Belanger stopped by to discuss the history of horror legends and shared some personal stories of his experiences with ghosts. He also gave some suggestions for his favorite local haunted spots across New England. Jeff is the host of the PBS New England Legends TV show and podcast. He will also host a virtual event with GBH on Monday evening; More information here.

Painter and playwright Ryan Landry stopped by to talk about how “The Chicks” commissioned some of his work and his latest piece, “Little Christmas Tree Shop of Horrors,” in which Boston Public Radio co-hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan will make an appearance. Landry also spoke about his love for Martha Stewart and his hatred for James Corden.

Leo Eguchi, Earl Maneein and Kareem Roustom performed for the latest episode of our Live Music Fridays. Leo is an acclaimed cellist with a new show “Unaccompanied”, highlighting the immigrant experience through music. Earl Kareem discussed their writing process for two of the pieces they composed for the show. The show begins Saturday at 7 p.m. at the Pao Arts Center in Chinatown.

We closed out the show by taking calls from our listeners to hear about their all-time favorite TV shows.

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Find out how to buy over-the-counter hearing aids https://swedishmusicshop.com/find-out-how-to-buy-over-the-counter-hearing-aids/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 21:48:46 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/find-out-how-to-buy-over-the-counter-hearing-aids/ Where can I find hearing aids in stores? Some retailers will offer over-the-counter hearing aids on regular store shelves, or at a kiosk or in well-marked designated areas. Other products, however, such as the $799 Lexie Lumen hearing aid, will be behind the drugstore counter, according to Luke Rauch, Walgreens senior vice president and chief […]]]>


Where can I find hearing aids in stores?

Some retailers will offer over-the-counter hearing aids on regular store shelves, or at a kiosk or in well-marked designated areas. Other products, however, such as the $799 Lexie Lumen hearing aid, will be behind the drugstore counter, according to Luke Rauch, Walgreens senior vice president and chief merchandising officer.

What is a audience assistance and What is that not?

Not all products that claim to help you hear better are classified as hearing aids. (Yes, it’s confusing.) Some are grouped into the categories “hearable” or personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), meaning they can increase the volume of all sounds in given environments. But the FDA says they are not “for use in diagnosing, treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing disease and are not intended to affect the structure or function of the body,” and are not a medical device.

“I think it’s up to retail chains to make sure they clearly differentiate over-the-counter hearing aids from PSAPs and amplifiers,” Klopper says.

The FDA has established (supposedly) consumer-friendly labeling rules for over-the-counter hearing aids, including the requirement that the outer packaging bear the “OTC” and “hearing aid” marks. Several models may also carry the “Over-the-Counter Self-Adjusting Hearing Aid” designation, such as the recently announced $1,000 in-ear Sony CRE-C10 sold on Sony’s website, as well as Amazon, Best Buy and elsewhere. .

The packages should also indicate whether a mobile device or computer is needed to help control the hearing aid, and whether the hearing aid connects, for example, via Bluetooth and/or USB-C. You can also see on the packaging if it uses a rechargeable battery, offers personalized programs and reduces background noise, as well as fine print warnings on when to see a doctor. Inside the box you should find a description of the accessories, illustrations of the operating controls and the battery compartment, technical specifications, etc.

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Kanye West to Buy Parler, Popular Conservative Twitter Competitor: NPR https://swedishmusicshop.com/kanye-west-to-buy-parler-popular-conservative-twitter-competitor-npr/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 12:17:25 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/kanye-west-to-buy-parler-popular-conservative-twitter-competitor-npr/ Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, has agreed to buy social media site Parler, the company announced on Monday. Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption toggle caption Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, has agreed to buy social media site Parler, the company announced on Monday. Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP […]]]>

Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, has agreed to buy social media site Parler, the company announced on Monday.

Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP


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Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP


Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, has agreed to buy social media site Parler, the company announced on Monday.

Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, has reached a deal to buy Parler, a social media site popular with Trump loyalists, the company announced Monday.

The surprise move comes days after Twitter and Instagram locked Ye’s accounts over a series of anti-Semitic posts that were widely condemned.

Parler, which calls itself the “pioneering uncancellable free speech platform”, called the restrictions Twitter and Instagram have placed on its accounts censorship, arguing that Parler’s more passive approach to moderation of content ensures that all voices can be heard.

“In a world where conservative views are considered controversial, we must ensure that we have the right to express ourselves freely,” Ye said in a statement.

In practice, however, Parler has been a hotbed of vaccine misinformation, bigotry, and right-wing conspiracies — content that generally doesn’t expressly violate Parler’s guidelines.

Parler is the social media site of Nashville-based parent company Parliament Technologies. He did not reveal the amount for which Ye agreed to buy the social media site, and no other terms of the deal were disclosed. But Parler officials said the deal should be done by the end of the year.

From Paris Fashion Week to Tucker Carlson, Ye’s latest controversies

Ye, whose music career and clothing line made him a billionaire, is a frequent and often erratic user of social media. Over the past few weeks, Ye has had some kind of controversy.

He landed in hot water earlier this month for wearing a t-short that read “White Lives Matter” to Paris Fashion Week.

In unaired excerpts from an interview he did with Tucker Carlson on Fox News that was recently posted by Vice, Ye espoused various anti-Semitic conspiracy theories. And he confused many when he claimed in the footage that “professional actors” had been placed in his home to “sexualize” his children.

Politically, Ye is a longtime supporter of former President Donald Trump, and he remains an ardent fan of the former president. A vocal critic of cancel culture, Ye frequently speaks out against what he sees as excessive surveillance of free speech in society.

This philosophy of everything is the hallmark of Parler, which has had a checkered history since its inception in 2018.

Deplatform, steering redesign and comeback

During the attack on the Capitol on January 6, hundreds of videos from the headquarters were posted on Parler, which before the violence had become a gathering place for far-right activists angry at Trump’s election defeat. .

Parler’s failure to remove violent and hateful posts in the wake of the Capitol riots led Amazon to split the social media site from its web hosting services, prompting a lengthy legal battle and the abrupt firing of its former CEO. John Matze.

Matze’s messy departure was the result of a confrontation between him and Rebekah Mercer, the Republican mega-donor and co-founder of Parler, over how the platform should handle inflammatory content, sources tell NPR. close to the case at the time.

Parler suffered an additional blow when Apple and Google removed the service from their app stores for violating their terms of service. Apple said it found posts that “encouraged violence, disparaged various ethnic groups, races, and religions” and “glorified Nazism.”

Since then, however, Parler has pledged to better monitor hate speech and violence on the site, leading Apple and Google to welcome the app back to their app stores.

Parler is competing in a crowded space, with several other conservative-friendly social media sites also trying to challenge Big Tech’s dominance. Among them are Rumble, a YouTube clone backed by billionaire venture capitalist Peter Thiel; Gettr, a Twitter-like service founded by a former Trump adviser; and TruthSocial, another Twitter competitor founded by former President Trump.

Ye’s ongoing purchase of Parler also comes as Twitter grapples with its own ownership saga. Elon Musk and Twitter are in heated negotiations and legal battles over his impending purchase of the platform, and the chief executive of Tesla and SpaceX has pledged, among many other proposals, to relax content moderation rules. from Twitter.

In a statement announcing the planned acquisition of Ye, Parler CEO George Farmer predicted the deal would have a huge impact on online discourse.

“Ye is taking a revolutionary step into the free speech media space and will never have to worry about being taken off social media again,” Farmer said. “Once again, Ye proves he is one step ahead of the legacy media narrative.”

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