Music shop – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 12:45:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://swedishmusicshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Music shop – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ 32 32 Pet Shop Boys Announces 2023 Tour and Here’s How to Get Tickets https://swedishmusicshop.com/pet-shop-boys-announces-2023-tour-and-heres-how-to-get-tickets/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 12:41:16 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/pet-shop-boys-announces-2023-tour-and-heres-how-to-get-tickets/ PET SHOP BOYS has announced a huge tour for 2023, and here’s how you can get involved. The arena tour will see them perform on huge dates across the country. 1 Want to see the Pet Shop Boys live? Available from Ticketmaster here, you can get tickets here. They’re on sale now, but you’ll have […]]]>

PET SHOP BOYS has announced a huge tour for 2023, and here’s how you can get involved.

The arena tour will see them perform on huge dates across the country.

1

Want to see the Pet Shop Boys live?

Available from Ticketmaster here, you can get tickets here.

They’re on sale now, but you’ll have to be quick if you want to pick up a pair.

The massive Dreamland Tour will see them perform at London’s OVO Arena Wembley, Leeds First Direct Arena and more.

Fresh off their headlining performance at Glastonbury on the other stage, this is a sight not to be missed.

The Pet Shop Boys were co-founded by Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe in 1981.

Neil was the lead vocalist while Christ was the keyboardist.

They go on to have sold over 100 million records worldwide and were listed as the most successful duo in British music history in the 1999 edition of the Guinness Book of World Records.

The Pet Shop Boys have been three-time Brit Award winners and six-time Grammy Award nominees. Since 1984, they have achieved 42 Top 30 singles.

Tickets to see The Pet Shop Boys live on tour are available here.

There are a limited number of tickets available for the 2023 Bruce Springsteen Tour.

The Vamps have announced a 10th anniversary tour and tickets will go live very soon.

Here’s how to get tickets for the Kid Cudi World Tour 2022.


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Power of puppets! RSC uses puppet captions for My Neighbor Totoro extravaganza | Arrange https://swedishmusicshop.com/power-of-puppets-rsc-uses-puppet-captions-for-my-neighbor-totoro-extravaganza-arrange/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:38:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/power-of-puppets-rsc-uses-puppet-captions-for-my-neighbor-totoro-extravaganza-arrange/ SWalk into the Los Angeles office of the Jim Henson Company and a bunch of Fraggle Rock doozers greet you at the front desk. Fozzie Bear watches from a filing cabinet, Sesame Street’s Big Bird poses in a giant rococo frame, and one of Maurice Sendak’s wild things crouches on a corner cabinet, hairs sprouting […]]]>

SWalk into the Los Angeles office of the Jim Henson Company and a bunch of Fraggle Rock doozers greet you at the front desk. Fozzie Bear watches from a filing cabinet, Sesame Street’s Big Bird poses in a giant rococo frame, and one of Maurice Sendak’s wild things crouches on a corner cabinet, hairs sprouting from its nose.

But among those American puppet idols hanging around the Henson company workshop is an ornament that will delight Studio Ghibli fans in Japan. It’s the prowling cat from his 1988 animated fantasy film My Neighbor Totoro. For the uninitiated, it’s exactly what it sounds like: a bus with a puffy tail, furry seats and headlight eyes that streaks across the screen, breaking into a Cheshire smile and emitting a meow savage.

It has to be one of the most anticipated moments from the upcoming stage adaptation from London’s Royal Shakespeare Company, which last month broke the Barbican’s box office record for one-day sales. Tickets got even hotter when it was announced that Jim Henson’s Creature Shop would be making the puppets. The show’s American goatee puppeteer, Basil Twist, loves the challenge. “I’m glad people are calling me and saying, ‘How are we going to do this? “” He laughs before happily inserting his fist into his mouth.

Crafting eyes… work in progress at Jim Henson’s Creature Shop. Photography: Jay P Morgan © SRC

I’m here to meet some of the Totoro crew but, this being the new norm in theatre, so Twist a Covid is joining us via laptop. The Creature Shop Creative Supervisor Peter Brooke and Manufacturing Supervisor Scott Johnson let me dig into the space where catbus and co will be made for the stage. There is a room for mold making, sculpture and mechanics; another for foam and fabric – the base materials that made Henson’s Muppets superstar. All around are animatronic contraptions – Brooke and I work on the handles of a device to bring a tentacle puppet to surprising life. Cables, laptops and a 3D printer sit alongside pots of glue, scissors and paintbrushes, echoing the mix of artisanal and digital production techniques used at Ghibli’s headquarters.

Although best known for its television and film projects, the Creature Shop has a long history of collaborating on stage productions and next year will bring Henson’s The Dark Crystal at the Royal Opera House, choreographed by Wayne McGregor. The Totoro puppets are always shrouded in secrecy, but Twist believes it’s important to present the magical scenes from a child’s perspective. In the film, sisters Mei and Satsuki move to the countryside with their father while their mother recovers. There, they discover a world of soot sprites and the whiskered, cuddly forest spirit Totoro, whom we see for the first time through Mei’s eyes. The puppet in the play will not be limited to the creatures but will inform the whole scenography: even the dilapidated house of the family is a puppet.

the Totoro wooden spirit.
Doudou… the Totoro wooden spirit. Photography: Walt Disney Pictures/Allstar

Joe Hisaishi – who composed the film’s melancholic and haunting score, which includes an irresistibly upbeat opening (“Hey, let’s go! Hey, let’s go!”) – received director Hayao Miyazaki’s blessing to take the reins of this international collaboration. His music will be played by a band on stage, not hidden in a pit. Totoro director Phelim McDermott says that when he first asked Hisaishi who he had in mind for the puppet, he expected him to suggest a veteran Japanese master of the bunraku Art form. But Hisaishi named Twist, an old friend of McDermott’s. Early on, Twist made Totoro prototypes “from very humble materials” to show off the Japanese production partners. “And they got it – not despite the humility of the materials but because of it,” says Twist.

Twist, who studied puppetry traditions in Japan, emphasizes the quiet, elliptical nature of Totoro’s storytelling, which contrasts with the more plot-driven Western style of animation for young audiences. “The first scene where we see Totoro, he’s practically asleep,” Twist explains. “He doesn’t even do much.” It’s hard to bring the film’s meditative pace to the huge Barbican theatre. “He’s got this mysterious stillness so, for a stage show, it’s like, hmm” – Twist scratches his head like Stan Laurel – “how’s that gonna work?”

'Totally into Miss Piggy'... master puppeteer Basil Twist.
‘Totally into Miss Piggy’… master puppeteer Basil Twist.

The puppet, Twist suggests, is about “something mysteriously coming to life,” so it’s intrinsically tied to Japan’s Shinto tradition, which recognizes the spirits that exist in nature and permeate Totoro’s tale. Mei and Satsuki’s father talks about a time when trees and people were once friends. Only children can see Totoro and have that special connection with nature. It’s a resonant message in the midst of our climate crisis, though McDermott points out that the film is never didactic.

Twist is known for its productions that use natural elements for their effects. In Symphonie Fantastique, directed by Berlioz, the fabrics swirled and shimmered in a tank of water as if they were sea creatures. Put a piece of fabric in water, he says, “and you really don’t have to do much and it becomes totally alive. Play a piece of music and it will end up in the music. His staging of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring was done with puffy silks and smoke. When Alfonso Cuarón had him work on the look of the Dementors in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Twist created them with fabrics for a flowing effect. “In the end, they did everything with computers,” he explains, but the style of the bliss-hungry monsters came from the “screen tests we did with water and wind.”

As a child, Twist was obsessed with the Muppets and “totally interested in Miss Piggy”. A shy student, he reported to school with the help of his puppets. People assume he has a stage name – after all, he captures the quirky wonder of his shows – but he’s really Basil Twist III, a third-generation puppeteer. His grandfather was a big band leader whose act used puppets of music stars, including Cab Calloway. When Twist was 10, his grandmother gave him these puppets and it “sealed the deal.” Growing up in San Francisco, he had watched puppet shows put on by his mother and friends at hospitals and birthday parties. Before long, he was doing his own shows, casting his younger siblings in roles: “I was always the impresario.”

Exit, chased by a bear… Twist's silky-smooth solution for the Royal Ballet's production of The Winter's Tale.
Exit, chased by a bear… Twist’s silky-smooth solution for the Royal Ballet’s production of The Winter’s Tale. Photography: Tristram Kenton/The Guardian

When Christopher Wheeldon recruited him for his Royal Ballet version of The Winter’s Tale, Twist was tasked with Shakespeare’s famously diabolical staging of “Go Out, Chased by a Bear”. His solution was to have the animal painted on a huge piece of silk whose movement was choreographed with as much care and impact as the dance. While in London, Twist collaborated with Kate Bush on her Before the Dawn concerts. “It was a big, ambitious project outside of the normal box of how rock concerts or stage productions are run,” he recalls. His work was closely related to that of the magician Paul Kieve. “We ended up being kind of a barometer of how the project might or might not succeed due to the sensitivity of how magic tricks or puppets helped guide the whole project.”

The Henson Company has also built stage puppets for musicians such as Lady Gaga and Kanye West. Today’s musical acts use sophisticated digital visuals, Brooke acknowledges, but the physical space the puppets take up on a stage is “an effect that digital can’t match.” What did Kanye’s monster look like? “A big sandworm dragon,” Brooke said. Is it in their workshop or in Kanye’s mansion? Johnson laughs: “He’s got it in his compound in the desert.”

Gods Ye... Henson's sandworm dragon creation for Kanye West, who now lives in the singer's desert compound.
Gods Ye… Henson’s sandworm dragon creation for Kanye West, who now lives in the singer’s desert compound. Photography: YouTube

Mainstream theater has widely adopted the puppet. The Lion King and the War Horse helped lead the way, and the RSC’s latest Christmas family show, The Magician’s Elephant, had ear-flapping and trunk-swaying delight at a main attraction. , controlled by a trio of puppeteers. Earlier this year, however, a few eyebrows were raised when the Olivier Award for Best Supporting Actor was shared by the team that controls the puppet tiger in Life of Pi: one gives the creature a voice, and three pairs of performers each represent her head, heart and doe. Is it theater or puppeteering?

“It’s performance at the end of the day,” says Brooke. “There’s no reason why a horse or a tiger shouldn’t be part of the cast.” Johnson thinks the award shows that people are finally seeing beyond the technical aspect of puppetry to appreciate the inherent acting in this art form: “In the past, when you were hired for a film, producers were often unsure whether they were hiring performers or backstage technicians. Brooke says puppetry in Britain, where he grew up, has always been limited to children’s theater and television, while in other parts of the world it is recognized as a sophisticated form of adult storytelling.

According to Twist, a truly well-made puppet already has built-in performance, whether wooden, sewn, or carved. A good puppeteer teases these qualities rather than forcing the object into particular movements. “Frequently in puppetry, we say that we are manipulating a puppet,” he says, “but I prefer the sense of ‘animating’. You bring something to life. Working with the Henson Company, he knows the puppets will have that magic built in. “So,” he said, with a catlike smile, “we can let them do their own thing.”

  • My Neighbor Totoro is at the Barbican, London, 8 October-21 January. Chris Wiegand’s flight to Los Angeles was paid for by the production.

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District Running Collective Co-Founder Matt Green’s Perfect Day in DC https://swedishmusicshop.com/district-running-collective-co-founder-matt-greens-perfect-day-in-dc/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 11:06:27 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/district-running-collective-co-founder-matt-greens-perfect-day-in-dc/ Placeholder while loading article actions In DC Dream Day, we ask our favorite people in the area to tell us how they would spend a perfect day in the District. nine years ago, Matt green and three friends hosted the Midnight On Mars 5K for Green’s 26th birthday. They teamed up with Avery’s Bar and […]]]>
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In DC Dream Day, we ask our favorite people in the area to tell us how they would spend a perfect day in the District.

nine years ago, Matt green and three friends hosted the Midnight On Mars 5K for Green’s 26th birthday. They teamed up with Avery’s Bar and Lounge on H Street, now closed, and promoted the event on Instagram and Facebook. Over 100 people showed up to run.

They turned this 5K into Neighborhood running collective (DRC) in the winter of 2014. What started as a group of less than 20 runners meeting in local bars and restaurants quickly grew to over 50 in the spring. Since then, DRC has grown to 150 paying members and a community of hundreds of runners who show up for weekly events. Runners of all experience levels are welcome to register and participate in three-mile runs on Wednesdays and longer runs on Saturdays. Additionally, DRC offers cross-training on Thursdays for paid members along with other perks such as race training plans.

“Seeing how running can change people’s lives between weight loss, injury, mental health and seeing people become empowered and sign up for a marathon or half marathon when there is at a year old they wouldn’t even think of running five kilometers brings me a lot of pride and joy,” says Green, who runs the weekly races with 15 captains from DRC headquarters on H Street NE.

When Green isn’t lacing his sneakers, he works as a visual information specialist for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, where he designs graphics and campaigns for the government agency. In addition to juggling work and errands, Green is also a DJ, a skill he has honed during the pandemic. It’s no surprise, then, that the Petworth resident’s dream day in DC revolves around connecting with his community through running and music.

Wednesday is my ideal day of the week because that’s when my week reaches its climax. I have DRC and it’s bump day. I would start my day probably around 7:30. After getting up and getting dressed, I’ll knock The Co-op coffee, and I ordered a regular black coffee, without sugar, without cream. Then I would go home. It’s a great way to stretch and get into the morning. Mornings are my favorite time of day. I think it’s probably one of the more peaceful times because there aren’t many people outside.

Then I would log into my government job, since I work from home on Wednesdays. I was working from my back porch or patio. After finishing work, I would start preparing to go to the DRC for our race on Wednesday.

Along the way, I would stop at Little leaf plant store on S Street NW, for ideas and to see what stands out to me. Then I would stop at Neopol Smokehouse at Union Market and get the BLT salmon with salt and vinegar chips. I would eat outside the market. Usually there are people there that I can talk to.

Then I would head to DRC, which is only a few blocks from Union Market. I took a bottle of wine for a drink after the race at Pursuit Wine Bar and Kitchen, which is opposite the head office. I would get a nice dry red like a Cabernet.

At that time, I will start DJing because people arrive around 6 p.m. I would make my announcements and encourage everyone to go running. There would be at least 100 to 120 people. We would run around the H Street area. Our itinerary may include bypassing RFK Stadium, Union Market and to the Capitol.

Then we can hit Vibe on H Street for post-race drinks and jerk wings. Then at 8 p.m., I say to myself, cool, it’s time to go out. I was going home to get ready for my DJ gig in Capo Deli, where I open for Cheri Nikki, a series of bi-weekly evenings. The friends who weren’t running stopped and we had a party.

I was finishing at Capo Deli around 2am so had a slice of late night pepperoni pizza with green peppers cut into squares of Pizza Duccini. Then it’s time to go home, and that’s the end of my very long day.

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The Port Hope Chill Zone hosts an open mic night during the summer https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-port-hope-chill-zone-hosts-an-open-mic-night-during-the-summer/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 15:09:03 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-port-hope-chill-zone-hosts-an-open-mic-night-during-the-summer/ Larry Harwood is one of the regulars who sits on one of the benches outside The Chill Zone ice cream shop in Port Hope every Thursday night. Harwood and others have spent every Thursday night for the past few weeks enjoying ice cream and live music during Open Mic Night, when everyone is invited to […]]]>

Larry Harwood is one of the regulars who sits on one of the benches outside The Chill Zone ice cream shop in Port Hope every Thursday night.

Harwood and others have spent every Thursday night for the past few weeks enjoying ice cream and live music during Open Mic Night, when everyone is invited to play an instrument and sing a song or two.

A retired truck driver and longtime resident of Port Hope, Harwood recalled how the building that now houses the cooling area once housed the barbershop where he had his hair cut as a child. The vacant building next door housed the telephone company, he said, and the buildings up the street were once a pool hall and store.

Harwood said her mother works cleaning one of the offices on that stretch of Main Street and her hairstylist likes to “take a pinch” behind her shop.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

As the evening wore on, a steady stream of customers lined up outside The Chill Zone’s ordering window, and most stayed for a while to listen to the musicians play between the ice cream shop and the post office. .

One of those musicians was Cliff Stuehmer, who is the organizer of the open mic night. Stuehmer said his setlist can feature artists like Bruce Springsteen, Lady Gaga and Ed Sheeran. He plays electric and acoustic guitar and ukulele and is sometimes accompanied by his wife, Rosemary.

Stuehmer said he had been at an open-mic night for nine years. He and his wife moved to northeast Huron County about 11 years after retiring from Ford Motor Co. as a powertrain engineer. He was one of many young Americans inspired by the British invasion in the early 1960s. His musical tastes are varied and he doesn’t like to limit himself to one era.

“When the Beatles came to town, everyone had a band, and so did I,” Stuehmer said.

Thursday night, Stuehmer was one of four musicians who performed. “Ron, Larry and Greg” rounded out the lineup, Stuehmer friends said he performed at open-mic nights.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday's open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

People enjoy ice cream and music at Thursday’s open mic night at The Chill Zone in Port Hope.

Mark Birdsall/Huron Daily Tribune

Kayla Lloyd, owner of The Chill Zone, bought the ice cream shop in 2018 after working for previous owner Gene Schuett, who was looking to sell his business at the time.

“It was the perfect time for me to buy it,” Lloyd said.

Lloyd said business has been great so far this summer and Thursday night music is a highlight of the week, with people cheering and dancing on the sidewalk.

“It’s a great opportunity to bring the community together for a fun night,” she said. “They’re having a good old time.”

The Chill Zone is open Monday through Friday from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. until Labor Day, then weekends until the end of September.

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PRS Guitars and Mark Lettieri Team Up for Limited Edition Artist Pop-Up Store https://swedishmusicshop.com/prs-guitars-and-mark-lettieri-team-up-for-limited-edition-artist-pop-up-store/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 00:25:05 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/prs-guitars-and-mark-lettieri-team-up-for-limited-edition-artist-pop-up-store/ PRS Guitars has opened a pop-up store in its online accessories store in partnership with PRS signature artist Mark Lettieri. The store features three limited-edition Fiore apparel styles as well as a handpicked selection of PRS accessories by Lettieri. PRS Fiore Designs Three unique clothing items are offered in the pop-up shop, including a full-zip […]]]>

PRS Guitars has opened a pop-up store in its online accessories store in partnership with PRS signature artist Mark Lettieri. The store features three limited-edition Fiore apparel styles as well as a handpicked selection of PRS accessories by Lettieri.

PRS Fiore Designs

Three unique clothing items are offered in the pop-up shop, including a full-zip hoodie, a raglan t-shirt, and a knitted beanie. Each item features the Fiore “flower” logo, which is featured on the truss rod cover of the Fiore model and was designed by Lettieri’s own mother.

Artist-selected PRS accessories

Also included in the pop-up store is a handpicked selection of PRS accessories by Lettieri, including the popular PRS Guitars Rechargeable Clip-On Tuner, PRS Guitars Care Kit, PRS Signature Cables and the same strings that come on PRS Fiore. model: PRS Signature 10-46 strings.

The pop-up store launched today, June 23, 2022, and will remain open until the inventory of Fiore designs runs out. To purchase the PRS Guitars Fiore pop-up store, visit the PRS West Street East online store:

In the USA: https://us.prsaccessories.com/

In Europe: https://eu.prsaccessories.com/

United Kingdom: https://uk.prsaccessories.com/

The PRS Fiore was introduced in January 2021. Its swamp ash body, 25.5 inch neck with maple fingerboard and single/single/hum pickup configuration made the PRS Fiore a unique model for PRS guitars. . For more information on Mark Lettieri’s signature guitar, the PRS Fiore, go to https://prsguitars.com/electrics/model/fiore_2022

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Woman describes how she unknowingly became an escape driver in Nipsey Killing https://swedishmusicshop.com/woman-describes-how-she-unknowingly-became-an-escape-driver-in-nipsey-killing/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:48:25 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/woman-describes-how-she-unknowingly-became-an-escape-driver-in-nipsey-killing/ The woman who drove the man accused of Nipsey Hussle’s murder testified in court on Monday, saying she unknowingly became the driver of the getaway. By NBC Los AngelesBryannita Nicholson, 35, recalled the moment she saw Nipsey outside a South Los Angeles mall on March 31, 2019. Nicholson, who met accused murderer Eric Holder Jr. […]]]>

The woman who drove the man accused of Nipsey Hussle’s murder testified in court on Monday, saying she unknowingly became the driver of the getaway.

By NBC Los AngelesBryannita Nicholson, 35, recalled the moment she saw Nipsey outside a South Los Angeles mall on March 31, 2019. Nicholson, who met accused murderer Eric Holder Jr. while driving for Lyft a little over a month earlier recalled, “I was like, ‘Ooh, it’s okay Nipsey, he’s fine. “”At the time, she mentioned to Holder that she wanted to take a picture with Nip.

The mall housed Nip’s clothing store, The Marathon, and the Master Burger restaurant where Holder asked Nicholson to take her. Holder got out of the car and walked towards the rapper as Nicholson was looking to park, and at no point did he mention to her that he knew Nip through street gang ties. As she reached Holder, she noticed his voice had risen. “Eric was asking Nipsey, ‘Did you tell anyone I reported?'” she testified.

Nicholson said she was able to take a selfie with the rapper, then rushed to her car to post the photo. “I was just excited, I was just happy, I just wanted to show my Facebook friends,” she said. After that, Holder walked into the burger joint and told Nicholson to drive around the block, at which point he pulled out a tractor-trailer. -an automatic handgun and I loaded it. “I was like, ‘What are you doing?’ You put that away, you won’t shoot anything outside my car,” Nicholson continued. “He put it away.”

She then stopped in an alley after Holder asked, and he said he would only stay for a few moments. Nicholson said he heard gunshots moments later and saw a man fleeing the scene. She considered leaving, but decided against it in case Holder was shot. Later he reappeared and told her to drive. “I was like, ‘What happened?'” Nicholson testified. “He said, ‘You talk too much, I should slap you.’ And he was just like, ‘Drive! Drive! ‘” It wasn’t until she got home that she learned that Nipsey had been shot and killed.

In the comments to his selfie with Nipsey, some said Holder was a suspect.

“Did you start thinking at that point that Eric might have done it?” Assistant District Attorney John McKinney asked in court, to which Nicholson replied, “Yes.” Despite this, she later agreed to pick him up and did not explain why she did so.

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German Record Stores Launch Petition to Fight DHL Against Rising Vinyl Shipping Fees https://swedishmusicshop.com/german-record-stores-launch-petition-to-fight-dhl-against-rising-vinyl-shipping-fees/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 08:12:33 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/german-record-stores-launch-petition-to-fight-dhl-against-rising-vinyl-shipping-fees/ Record stores in Germany are battling the German Post and DHL, after the organizations detailed price changes that will heavily affect the cost of international shipping. As of July 1, the dimensional requirements for packages shipped under the “Warenpost International” category – the standard for shipping vinyl records overseas – will be reduced. Once the […]]]>

Record stores in Germany are battling the German Post and DHL, after the organizations detailed price changes that will heavily affect the cost of international shipping.

As of July 1, the dimensional requirements for packages shipped under the “Warenpost International” category – the standard for shipping vinyl records overseas – will be reduced. Once the change is enacted, packages will need to arrive less than 25cm wide. Since 12-inch records measure approximately 31cm even before packaging is considered, record stores can no longer rely on Warenpost International for orders shipped to or from Germany.

At the moment, shipping a disc via DHL or German Post will cost between €5 and €10 (£4.29-8.58). When the changes go into effect on July 1, however, sellers will have to start shipping inventory in the “Päckchen M International” category, which can cost up to four times as much.

Talk to MixmagAndy Vas – owner of the German company old fashioned store – said: “It’s out of the question that people want to pay €20 to ship a €10 or €15 record.

Vas told the publication that international markets — the United States in particular — are crucial to the longevity of German record labels and stores. He continued, “I’ve been doing this since 1998, and the United States is our strongest market to sell records. No record store will survive without it, because we cannot survive on walk-in customers alone.

Before the changes were made at Warenpost International, Dirk Borrmann – owner of Cologne store Drake Records – started a Change.org petition to protest them. In a statement, he wrote: “Many record sellers and record store owners in Germany fear that the number of our foreigners [orders] will decline, which could be a fatal blow for many retailers who have already struggled to stay afloat during the pandemic. »

As of this writing, the petition has received just under 11,300 signatures, with a current goal of 15,000. You can support the petition by signing it here.

Late last year, UK artists and labels spoke of the “outrageous” impact and “spiraling costs” of sending music and goods to Europe as a result of Brexit. Alcopop! Records’ Jack Clothier, for example, said it was “difficult to fully separate Brexit from COVID issues” in terms of the factors that impacted international shipping, but pricing issues “outrageous” postage and delays were “end-to-end Brexit”. .

“Postage prices have skyrocketed,” Clothier said last November. “Two years ago we could ship vinyl to Germany for around £6, but now it’s double that or more. The couriers in the Czech Republic (where the majority of indie vinyl is pressed) are just going around in circles. Brexit. COVID. Both? All of this sends him through the roof.

“A vinyl manufacturer is even now telling customers that they need to leave room for increased production costs over the next six months, because we don’t know how screwed up the world will be by then. Imagine this email: ‘Sorry Jack, that vinyl you ordered six months ago is going up £400 because Boris destroyed our only remaining link to Europe’. You can cancel it and go somewhere else, but that will add another six months to your album campaign.” You’re stuck aren’t you?

“When you’re working extremely thin margins at an indie label anyway, you start adding all these expenses and suddenly you go from an extremely thin profit to a pretty big loss.”

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COLUMN: Record Store Day takes music lovers back in time https://swedishmusicshop.com/column-record-store-day-takes-music-lovers-back-in-time/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/column-record-store-day-takes-music-lovers-back-in-time/ The Village Media writer reflects on record collecting and a nearly 25-year journey to buy an album November 24, 1998 was a Tuesday. Like many Tuesdays in my teens and throughout my 20s, I stand in line at a checkout with music in my hand. That day: a CD copy of “Live on Two Legs” […]]]>

The Village Media writer reflects on record collecting and a nearly 25-year journey to buy an album

November 24, 1998 was a Tuesday. Like many Tuesdays in my teens and throughout my 20s, I stand in line at a checkout with music in my hand.

That day: a CD copy of “Live on Two Legs” by Pearl Jam.

Arriving at the HMV counter in the Upper Canada Mall, I notice the same album I’m about to buy, but not on CD. There, perched above the cabinets behind the cash registers, is a vinyl copy.

“Is it for sale?” I ask. It has already been sold, I am told.

“But we can make a special order for you.” My eyes light up. I’m buying the copy of the CD (to listen to it in my Discman as much as possible in the next few weeks) and gave my name and phone number to the clerk. I get a phone call as soon as he’s inside.

This HMV moved to two different locations in its remaining 15 years at Upper Canada Mall. The special order never arrived.

A lifetime of record collecting passed between that date and last Saturday. But finally, after almost 25 years, I was able to shoot my own copy of “Live on Two Legs” and hear the first words from Eddie Vedder’s mouth.

“The wait drove me crazy.” Editing, if not a touch inaccurate.

Saturday was Record Store Day at independent stores across Canada and around the world. Usually held in April (with an offshoot on Black Friday), this year Record Store Day has been split in half, a pandemic-driven pivot similar to those found in so many other industries. As one of the Record Store Day exclusives, “Live on Two Legs” has been reissued, on clear vinyl, and I’d be damned if I were to be kicked out again, even if it meant waiting two hours in line before to spend 11 minutes in total in the store.

Since 2008, Record Store Day has been a way to show the importance of independent record stores and the culture they help cultivate in their communities. Today it’s celebrated on every continent that has a record store (gather around, Antarctica) and on Saturday stores across our region saw queues of enthusiasts waiting to grab this (or more) record special limited edition that they just had to add to their collection.

I’m not so blind to realize that there are issues with Record Store Day that go beyond supply chain issues. Like most good things, it’s been somewhat sullied by corporate greed (only Visa will know how much I spent in total between April Day and Saturday) and unfortunate gimmicks (countless disks of pictures, three-inch discs or, worse, cassettes). But it’s still a great day for a community to form and for more people to enjoy the warmth that physical media can bring.

And we’re lucky in those areas not only to have the stores that we have, but also to have survived the pandemic. Every time I walk into one of my locations (the plural is on purpose because I feel like a regular at more than one store), I think of Rob Gordon from “High Fidelity”, explaining how he stayed afloat as the owner of Championship Vinyl.

“I get by thanks to the people who make a special effort to shop here – mostly young men – who spend all their time looking for deleted Smith singles and original, un-reissued – underlined – Frank Zappa albums . The fetish properties are not unlike porn. I’d feel guilty taking their money, if I wasn’t…well…kinda one of them.

By the way, it’s not just about “young men”. While those of us on Saturday morning were overwhelmingly middle-aged white men, the act of buying and enjoying records is more inclusive than ever and those who oppose it (who, admittedly, are probably white men of a certain age or writing ridiculous books like “Record Collecting For Girls”) need to be corrected.

Having a record collection, I admit, makes absolutely no sense. They’re inconvenient (you can only listen to them at one place) and expensive (in the US, part of the reason vinyl is now a billion-plus-dollar annual industry is the price $30 sticker way). They are bulky and clumsy; I’m moving next month and the one thing I don’t know how I’m getting from point A to point B is the thousand files currently neatly organized in my living room.

But the only meaning any collection should give is that it fills something in you that you may not have realized you needed. Whether it’s comic books or Fabergé eggs, having a collection of anything is the ultimate “do you” moment. You hardly need to justify it to yourself, let alone anyone. All he has to do is feel good.

And after all this time, few things seem fairer than cutting the wrap around the jacket, removing the record from the sleeve, putting it on the platter, and dropping the needle.

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Chris Evans wants to get his Little Shop of Horrors remake back on track https://swedishmusicshop.com/chris-evans-wants-to-get-his-little-shop-of-horrors-remake-back-on-track/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 01:48:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/chris-evans-wants-to-get-his-little-shop-of-horrors-remake-back-on-track/ Chris Evans has been spreading his wings since stepping down as Captain America in the MCU. Currently appearing as the voice of Buzz Lightyear in Pixar toy story spin-off movie Light year, Evans thought about the future and other projects he would like to be involved in. In addition to expressing interest in joining the […]]]>

Chris Evans has been spreading his wings since stepping down as Captain America in the MCU. Currently appearing as the voice of Buzz Lightyear in Pixar toy story spin-off movie Light year, Evans thought about the future and other projects he would like to be involved in. In addition to expressing interest in joining the star wars franchise, the star would also like to return to the Little Shop of Horrors project that almost started before the Covid pandemic hit and stopped everything.

In an age where musicals and nostalgia are big business, a reboot of the story of a man-eating alien plant that was originally released in the 1980s seems like a no-brainer and that’s what Evans hopes Warner Bros thinks. Little Shop of Horrors was released in 1988 and was an adaptation of the musical, itself based on an old film by Roger Corman who is probably best known for featuring a small turn of Jack Nicholson in one of his first screen roles . The musical film starred Rick Moranis as Seymour, a trampled florist who finds himself under the control of Audrey II, the sweet and persuasive plant who wants to take over the world.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

In an interview with MTV News, Evans revealed that with star warshe would like to have a role in a musical – quite ironic considering Rogers: The Musical moment in Hawk Eye featured a sung version of Captain America – and he really tried to hype it up to get Little Shop of Horrors back in motion. He said:

“I was supposed to do Little Shop of Horrors a few years ago and then, you know, COVID came along and there were budget issues. And I think actually the director might have jumped off the project, but it was heartbreaking. It’s my favorite. I even thought about posting my audition, just to stir the pot, just to see if I could push Warner Bros. a bit, to see if maybe… to be, for the very first time, I could get reactions from fans to let them know, ‘Come on, guys, do this thing.’ I sang ‘Dentist!’ song for my audition, and I got it on my phone. And I’m still thinking, ‘Is it crazy to post that?'”

Related: Chris Evans Is “So Proud” of Anthony Mackie’s Role in Captain America

Chris Evans would return to the MCU as the Human Torch

In recent interviews, Evans has spoken about leaving Captain America behind and hinted that if the right project comes along, he could possibly reprise the role although it would be “a tall order”. What would be more intriguing would be the possibility of returning to another Marvel role from his past: The Human Torch. Evans starred as Johnny Storm in Marvel’s The Fantastic Four and The Rise of the Silver Surfer, and now that the Marvel Multiverse plays a big part in the MCU, anything is possible. He said:


“Wouldn’t that be great? No, no one has ever come to me about it. I mean, I don’t look exactly like me anymore. That was 15 years ago, almost 20 years ago. But I love this character… Yeah, look, I would love to! I would love that. It would actually be easier for me than coming back as Cap. You know, Cap is so precious to me, and I almost don’t want to disrupt What a It was a great experience. But, Johnny Storm, I feel like he really didn’t have his day. That was before Marvel really found his footing. I like really this role, then, who knows.

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Record Store Day ‘Drops’ takes place this weekend https://swedishmusicshop.com/record-store-day-drops-takes-place-this-weekend/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 15:00:35 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/record-store-day-drops-takes-place-this-weekend/ There was an official Record Store Day this year, and it took place as usual at the end of April. Yet, due to the unpredictability of the Covid-19 pandemic, the organizers put a contingency plan in place, which is how we got to “Record Store Day Drops” this weekend. One of the main reasons for […]]]>

There was an official Record Store Day this year, and it took place as usual at the end of April. Yet, due to the unpredictability of the Covid-19 pandemic, the organizers put a contingency plan in place, which is how we got to “Record Store Day Drops” this weekend.

One of the main reasons for what turns out to be an addendum to music lovers’ vacations is the delay in manufacturing, shipping, etc., essentially getting the music from the pressing plant to the listeners’ turntable. RSD Drops serves as a backstop for street dates for titles that are slated to be part of the Record Store Day celebration in April, but for a number of reasons beyond their control were unable to hitting stores two months ago. In fact, some were slated for April until just days before it became clear they wouldn’t hit stores in time.

The Record Store Day Drops pit isn’t quite as deep as the main event, but there’s still a strong slate of tracks for discerning vinyl listeners when they hit your favorite participating record store, including a full list can be found on recordstoreday. com.

Here are some of the best for rock and roll fans to keep an eye out for that will be “dropping” this weekend.

RAY CHARLES: “GENIUS LOVES COMPANY”

One of the most popular and commercially successful albums of Ray Charles’ illustrious career, “Genius Loves Company” #1 on the Billboard 200 and won 8 Grammy Awards, including Album of the Year and the record of the year in 2005. It sold over 200,000 copies in the United States alone in its first week of release and went on to achieve triple Platinum status. The duo album features collaborations with some of the biggest names in music like Norah Jones, James Taylor, BB King, Van Morrison, Willie Nelson, Bonnie Raitt and more. The last album Charles ever recorded was a two-LP set limited to 2,000 copies.

MILES DAVIS: “WHAT IT IS: 07/07/83”

This double LP features one of Miles Davis’ last great bands with John Scofield on guitar, Bill “The Other Bill Evans” Evans on saxophones, flute and electric piano, Darryl Jones on bass, Al Foster on drums and the percussionist Mino Cinelu. Miles was back in stunning shape when he took the stage at the St-Denis Theater during the Montreal International Jazz Festival in July 1983, and this eye-opening performance was lovingly mixed and mastered for his very first vinyl release. for Record Store Day. , with 10,000 copies pressed.

FATS DOMINO: “HERE IS… FATS DOMINO”

Fats Domino was a true pioneer of rock ‘n’ roll, evident when he was declared “the true king of rock and roll” by Elvis Presley. “Here Comes…Fats Domino” is brilliant piano blues pop from Nashville with countrypolitan vocals and was his first album recorded outside of the Imperial label in over 13 years. Originally released in 1963, re-released again in 1975 and not since – and never released on colored vinyl until now – it comes on heavy purple blank vinyl in individual purple hand numbering limited to 1500 copies.

THE GREEN LIGHT! TEAM: “PROOF OF YOUTH”

The 15th anniversary of The Go! The team’s classic second album, “Proof of Youth,” is being put down for the first time since 2007. The LP goes from bubblegum pop to white noise in the blink of an eye. This time, the British indie rock band brought a band of glorious misfits to the party, including Public Enemy legend Chuck D, the original Double Dutch Divas, Maryland’s Rapper’s Delight Club, Marina de Bonde Do Role, Solex based in Amsterdam and Washington DC. Frederick Douglas All Star Cheer Team. Now reissued on a limited edition bubblegum vinyl, plus a bonus flexi-disc, and limited to just 900 copies.

THE KINKS: ‘WATERLOO SUNSET EP’

This year marks the 55th anniversary of the Kinks’ classic single “Waterloo Sunset.” To celebrate comes this 12-inch EP, which features a total of six songs with artwork from the track’s original 1967 French release. All songs on the yellow vinyl single, limited to 3,150 copies, are mono and remastered.

PEARL JAM: ‘LIVE ON TWO LEGS’

As Pearl Jam’s first true concert album, “Live on Two Legs” documents the 1998 US summer tour in support of the “Yield” album. The 16 tracks are pulled from all over the different towns – including a performance of “Red Mosquito” from what was then the Blockbuster Music Entertainment Center across the river in Camden. Limited to 20,600 copies, the collection comes on crystal clear vinyl in double gatefold LP packaging.

VARIOUS ARTISTS: ‘GO AHEAD PUNK…MAKE MY DAY’

Any fan of ’90s punk will surely remember coveting a copy of “Go Ahead Punk…Make My Day,” a classic CD sampler from Nitro Records. Originally released in 1996, the album delivered early cuts from some of the biggest names in West Coast punk. Available for the first time on vinyl, this reissue features 10 high-energy tracks from AFI, Guttermouth, Jughead’s Revenge, The Vandals and The Offspring – including the latter band’s cover of “Hey Joe”, a long-time fan favorite wanted that was previously exclusive to this compilation. Limited to 5000 copies, it is pressed on splatter orange vinyl.

THE WHO: ‘IT’S HARD’

The Who’s ‘It’s Hard’ celebrates its 40th anniversary with this extended two-LP set. Disc one is on orange vinyl and contains a half-speed remaster of the album, while disc two, on yellow vinyl, continues the rest of the LP with additional rare and previously unreleased material. This edition, limited to 6000 copies with illustrations by Richard Evans, is also accompanied by a period poster.

The vinyl of the week will return next week.

To contact music columnist Michael Christopher, email rockmusicmenu@gmail.com. Also check out his blog at www.thechroniclesofmc.com

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