Instrument store – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 21:14:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://swedishmusicshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Instrument store – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ 32 32 The Oxford Community Band turns 35 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-oxford-community-band-turns-35/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-oxford-community-band-turns-35/ This year, the Oxford Community Band celebrates its 35th anniversary. The community band can be spotted playing at Uptown events, at Oxford Senior Center and Talawanda High School. The band, formed in 1987, was started by Ted Beerman, who ran a local music store in Oxford. Beerman started the community group for adults who enjoy […]]]>

This year, the Oxford Community Band celebrates its 35th anniversary. The community band can be spotted playing at Uptown events, at Oxford Senior Center and Talawanda High School.

The band, formed in 1987, was started by Ted Beerman, who ran a local music store in Oxford. Beerman started the community group for adults who enjoy playing instruments. The group rehearses every Tuesday at Talawanda Middle School from 7:00 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.

The community group attracts a wide range of ages, with a 23-year-old as the youngest current member and an 83-year-old as the oldest. Sometimes the community group even had members in high school.

The band’s oldest member, Fred Schuurmann, joined in the community band’s second season in 1987.

Kathi Taylor also joined the community band in its second season and, after taking a few years off for her grandchildren, is back. Taylor played clarinet in high school but quit playing until she joined the community band.

“I saw the band live on the 4th of July, and they said ‘this is our last show of the season, but come next fall’ and so I did,” Taylor said. . “I was so excited. I had to go get a used clarinet really fast.

Valerie Ubbes joined the community group in 2011, and a year later her husband Bill Ubbes followed.

Valerie Ubbes began playing bassoon in ninth grade and spent her high school summers in the 70s at the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan. She didn’t play the bassoon again until 2008 when Bill bought her one, and in 2011 she joined the community band.

Her husband, a retired engineer, played trumpet in high school and was in a jazz band in college. Bill Ubbes put his instrument away for about 20 years, until his wife told their church music director that she knew someone who could play the trumpet. He has played every day since.

“It’s fun, it’s a good group of people and it’s an opportunity to play.” said Bill Ubbes. “It’s the highlight of the week for a lot of us.”

Bill Ubbes says his favorite memory in the community band is of a Christmas concert in Uptown.

“We were supposed to play ‘Here Comes Santa Claus’ until Santa Claus comes,” said Bill Ubbes. “Well, one year Santa Claus got lost, so we played ‘Here Comes Santa Claus’ for about half an hour. The conductor was looking around and saying, ‘I think I see, no, it’s not him.”

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Photo by Olivia Patel | The Miami Student

The Oxford Community Band attracts a wide range of ages, with a 23-year-old as the youngest current member and an 83-year-old as the oldest.

Over the years, some longtime members were unable to continue in the group.

“They’re moving into assisted living and can’t play anymore, and we really miss them,” Bill Ubbes said. “It’s like losing a parent.”

Mary Keister moved to Oxford in 2020 and joined the community group about a month ago. Keister said the group is a creative outlet and a great way to meet new people.

“It’s hard to get to know people in the community if you don’t engage in activities, so for me it’s a way for someone who’s newer to Oxford to get out and [meet] people while engaging in an activity that I truly enjoy,” Keister said.

Keister started playing drums in fifth grade. The band have long been without a percussionist and are delighted to have Keister.

Gregg Wentzell has been chairman of the community group since 2011. He joined the community group in 2001 after seeing an ad in Oxford Press and talking to friends who were already in the group.

“I did not join right away, I made myself [in] fit a little better and finally showed up for rehearsal,” Wentzell said. “It’s a perfect form of stress relief and something I didn’t realize I had missed as much as I did until I started doing it.”

As president, Wentzell’s role is to organize concerts, listen to feedback and welcome new members.

The group has about 20 regular members. Members of the community group came from all over the Oxford area, including Hamilton and Fairfield, Ohio, and New Haven and Richmond, Indiana. Many members of the group are Miami teachers, retired Miami teachers, and music teachers.

“The fact that we can attract everyone from local workers to students, teachers and retirees is a very diverse group,” Wentzell said. “It’s interesting that we have different people with different input on music and what they like to play on.

Austin Marshall is a group manager in Union County, Indiana. Marshall has been a member of the Oxford Community Band for about a year. He heard about it from another band manager in Indiana who is also part of the community band.

“One thing I really love about the band is that instead of being on the podium, I get to be where my students are when I’m yelling at them every day,” Marshall said. “Here I sit and think ‘maybe I could have done better’, so this is a humbling opportunity.”

Valerie Ubbes said her favorite part of the community band was performing for others.

“The most exciting part of the band for me is playing in nursing homes, the senior center and getting around town wherever we can play,” said Valerie Ubbes. “Giving music and gigs is really great, because the audience appreciates that and we play for them.”

Miami fourth-year student Kat Magnone joined the community group about a year and a half ago and said she enjoys its laid-back atmosphere.

“I started [in the band] because I had really missed something in my social calendar,” Magnone said. “I had always been in some sort of musical ensemble until I came to Miami, so I really missed that connection I had with the music and with my fellow musicians.”

The Oxford Community Band’s next performances are December 3 at the Oxford Holiday Festival in Uptown Park at 5 p.m. and December 12 at the Oxford Senior Center at 6:30 p.m.

The community group is always looking for new members of any playing ability, and no audition is required. Interested potential members can contact Gregg Wentzell (wentzegw@miamioh.edu).

giaquiln@miamioh.edu

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FlowersFlowers, owned by a woman, sells flower arrangements https://swedishmusicshop.com/flowersflowers-owned-by-a-woman-sells-flower-arrangements/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 03:19:28 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/flowersflowers-owned-by-a-woman-sells-flower-arrangements/ Jocelyn Mintz / Daily Contributor Inside FlowersFlowers, an array of flowers lights up the store. The bouquets are arranged to order. Store owner Joanne Leiman said the reason Evanston residents should shop at FlowersFlowers is simple. “We just have the best flowers in Evanston,” Leiman said. “They are of the highest quality and most unique. […]]]>

Jocelyn Mintz / Daily Contributor

Inside FlowersFlowers, an array of flowers lights up the store. The bouquets are arranged to order.

Store owner Joanne Leiman said the reason Evanston residents should shop at FlowersFlowers is simple.

“We just have the best flowers in Evanston,” Leiman said. “They are of the highest quality and most unique. I’m biased, but our designs are also the best.

FlowersFlowers has been blooming the Evanston community for over 30 years from its storefront at 1110 Davis St. Leiman and its employees work to create specialty flower arrangements for individuals and events.

Inside the store, flowers ranging from roses to Leonotis leonurus, or the lion’s tail shrub, sit in vases, waiting to be arranged in bouquets by employees.

The store imports and sells specialty flowers from countries around the world, including Holland, New Zealand and South Africa, which is part of why its products are so unique, said senior floral designer Amy Esquibel. .

“It’s an uplifting undertaking,” she said. “People receive flowers for happy occasions or to make themselves happier in sad times.”

Leiman is the third owner of FlowersFlowers, having bought the company 23 years ago. After working as a banking project manager for seven years, Leiman decided to change careers because she didn’t like the corporate world.

The bank where she worked was a small business, and as it expanded, Leiman said she realized she preferred a more intimate workplace. She chose a flower shop because she wanted to sell luxury items and make people happy, Leiman said.

“It’s a wonderful responsibility,” she says. “I feel like I have the opportunity to represent something that I’m proud to sell and share with the rest of the community.”

This fall, Leiman also turned to Northwestern’s student-run marketing agency, Form & Function, to explore advertising strategies for the company.

Weinberg senior Meghna Jain works as a project manager for FlowersFlowers marketing. She and a team of NU students worked to increase the store’s social media presence, design posters, improve its website and launch email marketing.

Leiman’s passion for selling flowers is easy to see, Jain said.

“It was a really cool learning experience,” Jain said. “Anything we suggest to Joanne, she immediately implements it. She was very receptive to us.

Leiman said she hopes to continue to grow the store in any way possible, as she views owning and operating a business as an evolutionary process.

Both Leiman and Esquibel like to give people something beautiful, Esquibel said. For Leiman, the end result of the floral arrangements they create is even more beautiful than the sum of its parts.

“It’s almost like an orchestra,” Leiman said. “A single instrument is beautiful enough on its own, but when you put it all together you really get something special.”

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @jocie_mintz

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New local magazine Our Evanston focuses on community and small business

Minority and Women Owned Small Businesses to Visit in Evanston

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Proteomics market worth $128 billion by 2032, says https://swedishmusicshop.com/proteomics-market-worth-128-billion-by-2032-says/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 12:10:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/proteomics-market-worth-128-billion-by-2032-says/ Selbyville, Delaware, Nov. 09, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Proteomics market value is expected to surpass $128 billion by 2032, according to a new research report from Global Market Insights Inc. The emergence of personalized medicine in the health sector is a determining factor in the adoption of proteomics approaches. The popularity of precision drugs continues […]]]>

Selbyville, Delaware, Nov. 09, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —

Proteomics market value is expected to surpass $128 billion by 2032, according to a new research report from Global Market Insights Inc.

The emergence of personalized medicine in the health sector is a determining factor in the adoption of proteomics approaches. The popularity of precision drugs continues to grow, due to the increasing prevalence of genetic disorders and the demand for effective health remedies.

Individualized drugs are also becoming the primary focus of health departments working on human genome sequencing. Proteomics techniques can help detect protein biomarkers, protein microarrays and pharmacoproteomics, and facilitate protein-based molecular diagnostics. With the shift in preference towards personalized care, proteomics technologies are expected to see strong demand from the healthcare industry worldwide.

Request a sample of this research report @ https://www.gminsights.com/request-sample/detail/5391

Proteomics market of instrument components segment surpassed USD 9 billion in 2022. Increased availability of electrophoresis equipment and microarray analyzers are among the major driving forces in the industry. These instruments are widely used in protein analysis and proteomics-based diagnostics. Furthermore, the ability to discover protein expression patterns and potential biomarkers will also increase the production of instruments for use in proteomics analysis.

Browse key industry information spread over 250 pages with 325 tables, figures and graphs of market data from the report, Component of Proteomics Market Statistics (Instruments, Consumables, Services), Technical (Advanced Technique {Mass Spectrometry, Gel Based Technique, Protein Chip}, Conventional Technique {ELISA, Chromatography Based Technique, Sequencing Edman, Western blot}, bioinformatics analysis), Application (clinical diagnosis, clinical research), end use (pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies, academic and research institute, laboratories), COVID-19 impact analysis, regional outlook, potential for application, price trends, competitive market share and forecast, 2023 – 2032” in detail with the table of contents:

https://www.gminsights.com/industry-analysis/proteomics-market

The advanced techniques segment proteomics market was valued at USD 23 billion in 2022. This is attributed to the availability of different mass spectrometry-based proteomics techniques designed to identify numerous proteins from a sample. Other advanced techniques, including protein chips and gel-based techniques, are also used in several analytical applications, including proteomics. Such developments in the analysis of complex samples are likely to contribute to the use of advanced proteomics techniques.

The clinical diagnostic applications segment will grow significantly by 2032, owing to advancements in proteomics technologies for the diagnosis of liver diseases. For example, in June 2022, a German-Danish research team developed a screening method for the early detection of alcohol-related liver disease using proteomics based on mass spectrometry. Additionally, the high economic burden of rare diseases will drive the use of proteomics tools in disease diagnostic applications.

The end-use segment of universities and research institutes held more than 24% share of the proteomics market in 2022, owing to increased government support for clinical research projects. For example, the Translational Proteomics Research Technology Platform provides support for collaborative proteomics research within the CRUK UCL Center and the Cancer Institute. This platform also provides the infrastructure for the quantification and identification of proteins and post-translational modifications, further fueling the demand for proteomics.

Middle East and Africa proteomics market expected to exceed USD 970 million in 2022, given the increasing prevalence of cancer and other chronic diseases. According to a report by Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America and the Swedish Institute of Health Economics, new cancer cases are expected to double by 2040 in MEA. The incidence rate of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases has also increased, amplifying the demand for proteomics in protein analysis applications.

Request to customize this research report @ https://www.gminsights.com/roc/5391

The competitive landscape of the proteomics market includes companies such as Biognosys AG, Creative Proteomics, SomaLogic Operating Co., Inc, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Bruker, Bio-Rad Laboratories, Quantum-Si, Inc, and PREOMICS GMBH, among others. These industry players incorporate strategies such as business platform and customer expansion to strengthen their presence in the market.

Browse our report store – GMIPulse@ https://www.gminsights.com/gmipulse

About Global Market Insights

Global Market Insights Inc., headquartered in Delaware, USA, is a global provider of market research and advisory services, offering syndicated and custom research reports as well as consulting services. growth. Our business intelligence and industry research reports provide clients with in-depth insights and actionable market data specially designed and presented to aid in strategic decision-making. These comprehensive reports are designed through proprietary research methodology and are available for key industries such as chemicals, advanced materials, technology, renewable energy and biotechnology.


        
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2023 BMW 7 Series First Drive https://swedishmusicshop.com/2023-bmw-7-series-first-drive/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 22:01:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/2023-bmw-7-series-first-drive/ What is Series 7? BMW has been making its biggest waves of late with performance-focused electrified M or i models, but it hasn’t forgotten about its core products. The 2023 BMW 7 Series Sedan has been redesigned from the ground up with new styling both inside and out. The infotainment and navigation system has been […]]]>

What is Series 7?

BMW has been making its biggest waves of late with performance-focused electrified M or i models, but it hasn’t forgotten about its core products. The 2023 BMW 7 Series Sedan has been redesigned from the ground up with new styling both inside and out. The infotainment and navigation system has been redesigned and the 7 is now available with BMW’s hands-free highway driving assistance. There are also significant changes under the hood, as the six- and eight-cylinder engines are now mild hybrids. Pour one for the V12, but a plug-in hybrid is coming in 2023. Oh, and BMW is launching an all-electric variant, though we’ll review that car, the BMW i7, separately.

We’ve had the opportunity to get behind the wheel of the 7 Series and the i7, and it’s both iterative and different from what’s come before. But given the success of the recently redesigned Mercedes-Benz S-Class, changes were in store.

What’s under the hood of the 7 Series?

The 2023 7 Series will be available with two powertrains when it launches later this year. A third powertrain – a plug-in hybrid – will arrive in 2023. The 740i is driven by a 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six and is mated to a 48-volt mild-hybrid system for reduced fuel consumption. Total rear-wheel power is listed at 375 horsepower and 383 lb-ft of torque. BMW claims the 740i can accelerate from zero to 60 mph in 5.0 seconds. The 760i xDrive replaces the turbocharged straight-six with a turbocharged V8. All-wheel drive is also included, which better manages the V8’s 536 horsepower and 553 lb-ft of torque. Both engines are mated to a new eight-speed automatic transmission that houses a 48-volt mild-hybrid system.

A fully electric variant of the 7 Series will debut with this generation. BMW calls it the i7, and it’s reviewed separately.

How does Series 7 work?

The 7 Series has long been one of the most capable sedans in its class, with generally sportier driving dynamics than cars like the Mercedes-Benz S-Class, Audi A8, Lexus LS and Genesis G90. We’ve only had a chance to try the V8-powered model, but it certainly still has some of that sports-sedan feel.

The new 7 Series is a big car, but it hides its size and weight well. The engine is smooth and powerful, and the exhaust note is beefy without being obnoxious. There’s more than enough power for everyday driving, so passing or merging takes little effort. If you need to downshift, the new eight-speed automatic transmission is quick and responsive, and the built-in 48-volt mild-hybrid system smooths out shifts and improves the engine’s automatic stop-start function.

While there are notable exceptions, modern BMWs don’t offer the level of steering feedback you’ll find in their predecessors. The steering is quick, but unless you have it in Sport mode it’s a bit light and lifeless. Switching to Sport adds weight to the steering, so the car feels a bit more direct, but there’s still some disconnect. Sport mode also sharpens the suspension, improves throttle response and speeds up shifting. In other modes, steering is light and rear-axle steering (standard on the 760i xDrive and optional on the 740i) tightens the turning radius to make parking the car easier.

How comfortable is the Series 7?

Luxury sedans like the 7 Series need to be as comfortable to drive as they are fun to drive. Every 7 Series model is equipped with an adaptive air suspension. It adjusts to road conditions and riding modes, lowering and stiffening in Sport or being more supple in Relaxed. The ride is fairly smooth and soaks up most bumps well. It still doesn’t smooth out imperfections as well as the S-Class, but neither driver nor passengers should complain about spending time inside the 7 Series.

How is the interior of the Series 7?

The 7 Series cabin is the most impressive we’ve ever seen in a BMW sedan. The interior environment combines glass, open-pore wood (we suggest staying away from dazzling shiny trim) and, of course, leather that elevates the design far above any other BMW. The stainless steel elements of the doors are elaborately detailed and sit on illuminated speakers.

At night, the 7 Series shows off its intricate ambient lighting elements, including the full-width backlit instrument panel that BMW calls the Interaction Bar. The interaction bar integrates simple climate controls in the section below the curved touchscreen (most are located in the touchscreen), while the buttons that automatically open and close the doors are located on the outer edges less. more distant. It’s smooth, but can be hard to see in bright light. The center console houses the iDrive infotainment system controller and drive selector (both in glass), as well as a button-less gloss black multifunction control panel.

There’s more on the back too. While amenities like pillow-style headrests, position-adjustable seats and a wireless charger are present, they’re also expected. However, the small 5.5-inch touchscreens on the door handles are quite unusual. They adjust the required seat, in addition to controlling the heating and ventilation functions, the individual climate zone, the ambient lighting, the audio system and the available Theater Screen entertainment screen (more on this later).

In terms of passenger space, the new 7 Series is slightly longer and wider than its predecessor, and headroom is said to be improved. There’s plenty of room to stretch out in both rows, even for taller passengers.

How is the 7 series technology?

The 7 Series features some of BMW’s latest in-car tech and driver aids, although we’ve seen much of it before on models like the BMW iX. Up front is a large curved screen that houses a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster and a 14.9-inch central touchscreen, the latter featuring BMW’s latest infotainment system, dubbed iDrive 8. .

The latest iteration of iDrive packs an all-new interface that controls most of the car’s main functions, from navigation to climate control. BMW removed most of the buttons from the car’s interior steering wheel included. It looks clean, but that means using the touchscreen for everything. It’s responsive but cumbersome at times, and we used voice commands a few times because we couldn’t find the button for something. Voice commands are good, but they feel like a crutch.

Audio options include a standard 18-speaker Bowers & Wilkins system or a 36-speaker surround sound system with speakers built into the headrests and ceiling. Perhaps inspired by its rival at Mercedes-Benz, the 7 Series is one of the first BMWs with an augmented reality overlay for the navigation system. With a destination programmed into the navigation, the image from the front camera will be projected onto the instrument cluster, with floating arrows showing you where to turn. It’s a neat feature that builds on the high-tech ethos of the Series 7, and it makes you want to use the built-in navigation rather than just using your phone.

This high-tech feeling could be best illustrated by the new optional cinema screen. A 31-inch widescreen display with 8K resolution unfolds just below the panoramic sunroof to provide a wealth of entertainment options for rear passengers. It has built-in Amazon Fire TV and can stream ultra-high definition content using the Series 7’s built-in 5G modem. It’s impressive in person, though the screen might be a bit too close for some passengers’ comfort. . It also doesn’t fit a standard ratio, so everything you watch may be cut or letterboxed. When deployed it also renders the rear window useless, and the Series 7 oddly doesn’t offer a digital rear-view mirror. Get used to using those side mirrors, folks.

Many improvements have also been made to the advanced driver aids on board. The forward collision mitigation system, for example, can now recognize oncoming traffic and brake to avoid a collision. The Parking Assistant Professional feature that debuted on the iX also makes an appearance here, allowing drivers to teach the vehicle how to enter or exit difficult driveways. Drivers can also enjoy semi-automated driving at higher speeds. The available Highway Assistant feature allows drivers to go hands-free at speeds of up to 80mph – twice the previous speed limit permitted by BMW. You can also tap to change lanes, though you should always be ready to take over. The car will watch your face to make sure you are paying attention.

All of these features and more come together in a 7 Series with technology that has advanced by leaps and bounds over the older model.

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NASA’s ‘flashlight’ will hunt hidden lunar water https://swedishmusicshop.com/nasas-flashlight-will-hunt-hidden-lunar-water/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/nasas-flashlight-will-hunt-hidden-lunar-water/ NASA is sending a “flashlight” to the moon to hunt for hidden lunar water – and its findings could shape future human exploration of the moon’s surface. The challenge: NASA suspects that the floors of permanently shadowed craters near the moon’s south pole are covered in a thin layer of water ice, but it doesn’t […]]]>

NASA is sending a “flashlight” to the moon to hunt for hidden lunar water – and its findings could shape future human exploration of the moon’s surface.

The challenge: NASA suspects that the floors of permanently shadowed craters near the moon’s south pole are covered in a thin layer of water ice, but it doesn’t know exactly how much ice or how accessible it might be – and we would like really like to know.

“If we’re planning to send astronauts out there to dig up the ice and drink it, we need to be sure it exists.”

Barbara Cohen

“While we have a pretty good idea that there is ice inside the moon’s coldest and darkest craters, previous measurements were a bit ambiguous,” said lead researcher Barbara Cohen. from NASA’s Lunar Flashlight mission in 2020.

“Scientifically, that’s fine, but if we’re planning to send astronauts out there to dig up the ice and drink it, we have to be sure it exists,” she continued.

Lunar water: On or after November 22, NASA plans to launch Lunar Flashlight, a briefcase-sized satellite, aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. The mission of the satellite is to identify surface ice on the floors of shadowed southern craters of the moon.

To do this, he will use an instrument called a “laser reflectometer” to shine four lasers into the craters and measure the reflections. Water will readily absorb light from lasers, while bare rock will reflect it, so these measurements will help reveal how much lunar water is inside a crater.

NASA Solar Powered Lunar Flashlight. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

“We will for the first time make definitive measurements of surface water ice in permanently shaded regions,” Cohen said.

“We will be able to correlate Lunar Flashlight observations with other lunar missions to understand the extent of this water and whether it could be used as a resource by future explorers,” she continued.

The mission: After launch, the lunar flashlight will be sent far beyond the moon before being pulled by gravity from the sun and Earth. The satellite will then settle into a near-rectilinear halo orbit that sees its distance to the moon extend from 42,000 miles to just 9 miles.

“The reason for this orbit is to be able to get close enough for Lunar Flashlight to shine its lasers and get good return from the surface, but also to have a stable orbit that consumes little fuel,” Cohen said.

The lunar flashlight should be able to pass over the southern craters of the moon 10 times in about 2 months. If enough propellant remains after that, it could make additional orbits before the mission ends with a crash landing on the moon’s surface.

“We will for the first time make definitive measurements of surface water ice in permanently shaded regions.”

Barbara Cohen

First of its kind: In addition to helping NASA measure lunar water in shadowed craters for the first time, Lunar Flashlight will also be the first mission to use a laser reflectometer to hunt water ice.

Additionally, it will be the first interplanetary spacecraft powered by “green” propellant, which NASA says is less toxic, more efficient, and easier to store and transport than hydrazine, a fuel commonly used as satellite propellant. .

“A technology demonstration mission like Lunar Flashlight, which is less expensive and fills a specific gap in our knowledge, can help us better prepare for an extended NASA presence on the moon as well as test key technologies that could be used in future missions,” Lunar Flashlight Project Manager John Baker said in 2020.

We would love to hear from you! If you have a comment about this article or have a tip for a future Freethink story, please email us at [email protected].

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Salina’s Best of the Best awards see support for local businesses https://swedishmusicshop.com/salinas-best-of-the-best-awards-see-support-for-local-businesses/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 11:13:18 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/salinas-best-of-the-best-awards-see-support-for-local-businesses/ It seems that members of the Salina community love and support local businesses after several beat out national chains in this year’s Salina Best of the Best awards. The operators of these local businesses, which range from pharmacies and steakhouses to shoe stores and hearing care professionals, have one thing in common: serving the community […]]]>

It seems that members of the Salina community love and support local businesses after several beat out national chains in this year’s Salina Best of the Best awards.

The operators of these local businesses, which range from pharmacies and steakhouses to shoe stores and hearing care professionals, have one thing in common: serving the community with quality local service.

Caring for people in their own community

The community’s choice for Best Pharmacy or Pharmacy went to B&K Prescription Shop, which General Manager Leroy Burks said shows how the company serves the community.

“For us, it’s about customer service and taking care of patients and people,” Burks said.

After:Salina Photographer Features Native American War Dance in Exhibit

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Area Arts & Entertainment News | New https://swedishmusicshop.com/area-arts-entertainment-news-new/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 19:35:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/area-arts-entertainment-news-new/ Bartender’s Ball on tap at the B Side ONEONTA — The annual Bartender’s Ball and Halloween Costume Party will return to the B-Side Ballroom at 1 Clinton Plaza at 7 p.m. on Saturday, October 29. The bartenders will be Patti Canner, Sabrina Beckerink, Chris Patterson and Jim Brady. Photo exhibition ready to open STAMFORD – […]]]>

Bartender’s Ball on tap at the B Side

ONEONTA — The annual Bartender’s Ball and Halloween Costume Party will return to the B-Side Ballroom at 1 Clinton Plaza at 7 p.m. on Saturday, October 29.

The bartenders will be Patti Canner, Sabrina Beckerink, Chris Patterson and Jim Brady.

Photo exhibition ready to open

STAMFORD – A community photo exhibit will open with a reception from 3-5 p.m. on Saturday, October 29 at the Headwaters Arts Center at 66 Main St. in Stamford.

The gallery’s second exhibition in the art space will run until January 7.

‘Misery’ will end with the Sunday matinee

DOWNTOWN — The Bigger Dreams production of “Misery,” based on the Stephen King novel, premieres at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 29 and concludes with a matinee performance at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 30.

The play opened Oct. 21 at the Foothills Performing Arts and Civic Center production facility at 24 Market St. in Oneonta.

According to a press release, the production includes mature subjects. The cast includes Brooke Tallman, Steve Dillon and Darcy Gibson.

General admission tickets are $20; tickets for students and seniors are $15. They are available at www.bigger dreamsproductions.org/tick ets.

Sitar concert scheduled for Friday

ONEONTA — Sitarist Arjun Verma will perform at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 4 at First United Methodist Church at 66 Chestnut St. in Oneonta, as part of the Oneonta Concert Association’s 2022-23 season.

The sitar is described as a plucked string instrument, originating from the Indian subcontinent, used in Hindustani classical music.

According to a press release, Arjun is the son of Roop Verma of Oneonta, a disciple of Ali Akbar Khan and Ravi Shankar.

Arjun started learning the sitar from his father when he was 5 years old. He plays in a style described as encompassing the deeply contemplative as well as the uplifting elements of Indian music.

Visit www.OneontaCon certAssociation.org for more information and tickets or reserve by calling 607-376-7283.

Tickets can also be purchased at Oneonta at the Eighth Note Music Store at 10 S. Main St. and the Green Toad Bookstore at 198 Main St.

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Boston man charged with armed robbery at Downtown Crossing DSW store – Boston 25 News https://swedishmusicshop.com/boston-man-charged-with-armed-robbery-at-downtown-crossing-dsw-store-boston-25-news/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 21:23:42 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/boston-man-charged-with-armed-robbery-at-downtown-crossing-dsw-store-boston-25-news/ BOSTON — A Boston man is facing armed robbery charges after authorities say he stole sneakers from a DSW while holding a knife. Jason Johnson, 41, was arraigned Friday on one count of armed robbery in Boston City Court’s Central Division, District Attorney Kevin Hayden said in a statement. Judge Paul Treseler ordered Johnson held […]]]>

BOSTON — A Boston man is facing armed robbery charges after authorities say he stole sneakers from a DSW while holding a knife.

Jason Johnson, 41, was arraigned Friday on one count of armed robbery in Boston City Court’s Central Division, District Attorney Kevin Hayden said in a statement.

Judge Paul Treseler ordered Johnson held on $1,000 bail and ordered him to stay away from the store. Johnson is due back in court Nov. 15 for a probable cause hearing.

On September 29, officers responded to a report of a person with a knife at DSW on Washington Street, with the suspect stealing a pair of shoes from the store with a knife in his hand.

At around 7:30 p.m., the suspect, later identified as Johnson, entered the store and began rummaging through boxes.

When he entered, the store’s buzzer went off indicating that he had stolen items from another store. Staff noticed Johnson placing a pair of black Adidas sneakers on his feet, leaving the box on the ground.

When approached by the store manager, police claimed Johnson said, “I don’t have to pay for this.” He then pulled a knife from his backpack and started throwing things.

While reviewing surveillance video footage, detectives observed Johnson approach the escalator with his right arm extended to the side and a metal instrument in his hand.

Johnson left the store without paying for $269.98 worth of merchandise.

On October 6, employees identified Johnson via a series of photos.

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The lasting influence of American original Elizabeth Cotten https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-lasting-influence-of-american-original-elizabeth-cotten/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 05:34:47 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-lasting-influence-of-american-original-elizabeth-cotten/ At 15 she had married a man named Frank Cotten, and at 17 she had a daughter, Lillie. Although she continued to perform occasionally in church, she eventually put music aside to focus on domestic life. Elizabeth didn’t return to music until her mid-60s, and she may never have done so if not for a […]]]>

At 15 she had married a man named Frank Cotten, and at 17 she had a daughter, Lillie. Although she continued to perform occasionally in church, she eventually put music aside to focus on domestic life.

Elizabeth didn’t return to music until her mid-60s, and she may never have done so if not for a chance encounter with one of America’s most prestigious musical families.

One day, while selling dolls in a department store in Washington DC, she encountered a lost child and returned him to his mother. That child turned out to be Peggy Seeger, daughter of composer Ruth Crawford Seeger and pioneering ethnomusicologist Charles Seeger, and half-sister of Pete Seeger, who was to become one of the most famous folk singers of her generation.

Ruth needed a new housekeeper to cook and clean for the children, and she offered the job to Elizabeth. The Seeger family nicknamed her Libba and had no idea of ​​her musical talents until Peggy, then a teenager, discovered her playing one of the family’s guitars.

“I walked into the kitchen and saw Libba playing the guitar hanging on the wall. And she was playing Freight train“, she recalled later. “Then she started trotting songs. She knew a lot of songs. We would have been happy to cook and clean if she had just played!

Peggy’s brother Mike, also a budding musician and folklorist, asked Libba if he could record it. His first album Elizabeth Cotten: Negro Folk Songs and Melodieswas released on the Folkways label in 1958, when she was 62.

Nearly 50 years after first learning an instrument, Elizabeth has returned to playing and composing. She has performed at major events with Mike Seeger, such as the Newport Folk Festival, alongside some of the biggest names in the folk and blues scene; artists like Muddy Waters, Mississippi John Hurt and John Lee Hooker.

She became an important figure in the 60s folk revival, continuing to release music on Folkways Records throughout the 60s and 70s. Other artists sought to emulate her austere and intimate sound. Freight train was a particular favorite among many of the most popular artists of the day, including Peter Paul and Mary, Jerry Garcia and Joan Baez, all of whom added the song to their repertoires.

Rooted in traditional bluegrass with hints of ragtime and church music, Cotten’s unique two-finger playing style, known as Cotten-picking, made his music stand out instantly, and still does. There is an authentic warmth and simplicity to his playing, singing and songwriting.

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Remaining out of sight for so long, Elizabeth has established herself as a key figure in American traditional music. In 1984 she received an American Heritage Fellowship and the following year she won a Grammy for Best Ethnic or Traditional Folk Recording. In 1987, at the age of 94, she died.

Although the song is over 100 years old, Freight train is still covered and reinterpreted by contemporary artists around the world. Eleven-year-old Elizabeth Cotten’s dream of escaping the mundane to seek a new life continues to resonate.

Deb Grant is a Big Issue jazz radio host and critic

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Scathing new review of Australia’s use of lockdowns and school closures https://swedishmusicshop.com/scathing-new-review-of-australias-use-of-lockdowns-and-school-closures/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 03:37:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/scathing-new-review-of-australias-use-of-lockdowns-and-school-closures/ A year on from some of Australia’s heaviest lockdowns, one of the country’s biggest non-governmental reviews of the response has called many of the policies adopted “unprecedented” while criticizing the use of lockdowns as “excessive ” and “hard”. ‘They have proven to be a blunt instrument’, according to ‘Fault lines: An Independent Review into Australia’s […]]]>

A year on from some of Australia’s heaviest lockdowns, one of the country’s biggest non-governmental reviews of the response has called many of the policies adopted “unprecedented” while criticizing the use of lockdowns as “excessive ” and “hard”.

‘They have proven to be a blunt instrument’, according to ‘Fault lines: An Independent Review into Australia’s Response to COVID-19’, which also revealed that politics was never far from the decision-making of heads of state responsible for rolling out lockdowns and internal border closures. .

“Initially, an anxious Australia seemed to accept that far-reaching lockdowns were necessary, even desirable. But the balance between the costs and benefits of lockdowns swung towards costs long before governments were willing to lift them,” the review says.

“Many lockdowns were avoidable. Some were the result of failures in our quarantine systems, contact tracing systems, slow deployment of vaccines, and gaps in our communication with key parts of our community.

A person crosses Bourke Street in Melbourne, Australia, on July 20, 2021. (Daniel Pockett/Getty Images)

“Some decisions were politically motivated. Some responded to public fear stoked by the media.

The report was chaired by Peter Shergold, Chancellor of Western Sydney University, along with a panel including Jillian Broadbent, director of global financial services firm Macquarie Group, Isobel Marshall, 2021 Young Australian of the Year and Hardworking social enterprise, as well as Peter Varghese, Chancellor of the University of Queensland. They were supported by the e61 Institute.

The panel also noted that the lockdowns exacerbate inequalities between the poorer parts of Australian cities and the wealthier areas and that further research was needed into the potential long-term consequences on the mental health of residents enduring government restrictions. .

In response, Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, whose government was responsible for placing Melbourne under one of the world’s longest lockdowns, defended his government’s approach.

“That is why when I tell you that these decisions were not taken lightly and they were the subject of debate and discussion and very careful consideration,” he said. to journalists.

Politics has never strayed from COVID politics

The group noted that “political calculus was never far from the surface of COVID-19 decisions.”

“It became clear that experts (both inside and outside government) often differed in their advice. Government leaders cannot abdicate responsibility for decisions, especially those with long-term consequences such as shutdowns and mandatory health orders,” the report said.

The panel said the policy had weakened the effectiveness of the National Cabinet, which was formed to help coordinate the state and federal response to COVID-19 but lacked real executive power.

“Heads of state insisted on going their own way, emboldened by their constitutional prerogatives,” the report said. “Strong action against COVID-19, including the decision to close schools, was deemed politically popular by many state leaders. Until that popularity wanes and those policies are relaxed.

Epoch Times Photo
Former Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison (centre) and then-state Prime Ministers and Chief Ministers speak to the media in the Main Committee Chamber of Parliament in Canberra, Australia on 11 December 2020. (Sam Mooy/Getty Images)

“Nothing captures the political drivers of many COVID-19-related decisions better than the shift from tough mandatory health orders in 2020 and 2021 to embracing personal choice in 2022.

The COVID-19 response by state governments is believed to have contributed to the election victories of several incumbent leaders over the course of 2020 to 2021.

In addition, tensions between the Labor-dominated state governments and the Federal Liberal-National coalition would emerge with disputes over funding for initiatives such as free rapid antigen tests and quarantine facilities.

Schools should not be closed

The panel said schools should remain open in future health crises unless there is enough strong evidence to suggest otherwise.

“Clear profitability and risk management frameworks must be established. Closures should be targeted so that only specific schools are closed and not entire school systems,” the report said.

“Sweden controversially decided to keep schools open during the pandemic, relying on good hygiene and social distancing awareness to reduce the risk of infection,” he added. “Yet the incidence of acute COVID-19 in children has remained low.”

The panel said less than 0.02% of Swedish teachers needed intensive care and children did not experience the same loss of learning opportunities as those in other countries.

In addition, according to the New South Wales (NSW) Mental Health Commission, 60% of parents of upper secondary students believed their children had been negatively affected by school closures during the most severe conditions in 2021.

“Early evidence suggests secondary school students in NSW have fallen months behind in their learning after missing more than a term of face-to-face learning during the 2021 lockdown.”

School closure policies have also forced mothers out of the workforce to care for their children. While other problems such as mental health problems, increased alcohol consumption and lack of physical exercise resulted.

Australia’s reputation, damaged economy

The panel said Australia’s international reputation had also been damaged in response to the global attention its lockdowns had received.

Extensive restrictions at international borders have led to a drop in the number of workers, with the country now needing an additional 190,000 workers to service the economy.

“Governments and the Reserve Bank of Australia have understandably over-insured in response to the crisis,” the report said. “But we are now living with some of the costs of that overinsurance as inflation and interest rates rise sharply.”

Epoch Times Photo
Shoppers gather to buy fruit and vegetables at a store in the suburb of Fairfield in Sydney, Australia, on July 9, 2021. (Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images)

In developed countries, interest rates and inflation are rising in concert as central banks attempt to contain rising prices for basic goods and services. The problem stems from the overprinting of currency by governments and reserve banks as they subsidized businesses and individuals unable to work during the shutdowns.

“[This] insurance is not free. Federal government net debt rose from 19% of GDP in 2019 to 28% of GDP in 2022,” the report said.

“It will take over 20 years to return to Australia’s pre-COVID debt-to-GDP level if the economy regains its long-term GDP growth rate,” he continued, noting that debt of state and territory governments was four times higher. compared to 2019 levels.

“Restoring fiscal policy buffers is key to providing sufficient firepower to respond to the next crisis. Governments will have to decide who should bear the cost of fiscal repair and how much will go to young people. »

The report is funded by the Paul Ramsay Foundation, the Minderoo Foundation (backed by billionaire Andrew Forrest) and the John and Myriam Wylie Foundation.

Daniel Y.Teng

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Daniel Y. Teng is based in Sydney. It focuses on national affairs, including federal politics, the response to COVID-19 and Australia-China relations. Do you have any advice? Contact him at daniel.teng@epochtimes.com.au.

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